RSS

Monthly Archives: September 2012

Testimony of Harpreet Singh Saini before the UNITED STATES SENATE Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights Committee on the Judiciary on “Hate Crimes and the Threat of Domestic Extremism”

September 19, 2012
My name is Harpreet Singh Saini. I would like to thank Senator Durbin, Ranking Member
Graham, and the entire subcommittee for giving me the opportunity to be here today. I am here
because my mother was murdered in an act of hate 45 days ago. I am here on behalf of all the
children who lost parents or grandparents during the massacre in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.
A little over a month ago, I never imagined I’d be here. I never imagined that anyone outside of
Oak Creek would know my name. Or my mother’s name. Paramjit Kaur Saini. Or my brother’s
name, Kamaljit Singh Saini. Kamal, my brother and best friend, is here with me today.
As we all know, on Sunday, August 5, 2012, a white supremacist fueled by hatred walked into
our local Gurdwara with a loaded gun. He killed my mother, Paramjit Kaur, while she was
sitting for morning prayers. He shot and killed five more men – all of them were fathers, all had
turbans like me.
And now people know all our names: Sita Singh. Ranjit Singh. Prakash Singh. Suvegh Singh.
Satwant Singh Kaleka.
This was not supposed to be our American story. This was not my mother’s dream.
My mother and father brought Kamal and me to America in 2004. I was only 10 years-old. Like
many other immigrants, they wanted us to have a better life, a better education. More options. In
the land of the free. In the land of diversity.
It was a Tuesday, 2 days after our mother was killed, that my brother Kamal and I ate the
leftovers of the last meal she had made for us. We ate her last rotis – which are a type of South
Asian flatbread. She had made the rotis from scratch the night before she died. Along with the
last bite of our food that Tuesday…came the realization that this was the last meal, made
by the hands of our mother, that we will ever eat in our lifetime. My mother was a brilliant woman, a reasonable woman. Everyone knew she was smart, but she
never had the chance to get a formal education. She couldn’t. As a hard-working immigrant, she
had to work long hours to feed her family, to get her sons educated, and help us achieve our
American dreams. This was more important to her than anything else.
Senators, my mother was our biggest fan, our biggest supporter. She was always there for us, she
always had a smile on her face.
But now she’s gone. Because of a man who hated her because she wasn’t his color? His religion?
I just had my first day of college. And my mother wasn’t there to send me off. She won’t be
there for my graduation. She won’t be there on my wedding day. She won’t be there to meet her
grandchildren.
I want to tell the gunman who took her from me: You may have been full of hate, but my mother
was full of love.
She was an American. And this was not our American dream.
It was not the American dream of Prakash Singh, who had only been reunited with his family for
a few precious weeks after 6 years apart. When he heard gunshots that morning, he told his two
children to hide in the basement. He saved their lives. When it was over, his children found him
lying in a pool of blood. They shook his body and cried “Papa! Get up!” But he was gone.
It was not the American dream of Suvegh Singh Khattra, a retired farmer who came here to be
with his children and grandchildren. That morning, his family found him face down, a bullet in
his head, his turban thrown to the side.
It was not the American dream of Satwant Singh Kaleka, president of the gurdwara who was
killed while bravely fighting the gunman.
It was not the American dream of Sita Singh and Ranjit Singh, two brothers who sang prayers for
our community and were separated from their families for 16 years. Their wives and children
came to this country for the first time for their funerals.
It was not the American dream of Santokh Singh or Punjab Singh who were injured in the
massacre. Punjab Singh’s sons are by his side day and night, but he may never fully recover from
his multiple gunshot wounds.
We ache for our loved ones. We have lost so much. But I want people to know that our heads are
held high.
My mother was a devout Sikh. Like all Sikhs, she was bound to live in Chardi Kala – a state of
high spirits and optimism. She was also taught as a Sikh to neither have fear of anyone nor strike
fear in anyone. So despite what happened, we will not live in a state of fear, nor will be make anyone fearful.
Like my Mother, my brother and I are working every day to be in a state of high spirits and
optimism.
We also know that we are not alone. Tens of thousands of people sent us letters, attended vigils,
and gave us their support – Oak Creek’s Mayor and Police Chief, Wisconsin’s Governor, the
President and the First Lady. All their support also gave me the strength to come here today.
Senators, I came here today to ask the government to give my mother the dignity of being a
statistic. The FBI does not track hate crimes against Sikhs. My mother and those shot that day
will not even count on a federal form. We cannot solve a problem we refuse to recognize.
Senators, I also ask that the government pursue domestic terrorists with the same vigor as
attackers from abroad. The man who killed my mother was on the watch lists of public interest
groups. I believe the government could have tracked him long before he went on a shooting
spree.
Finally, Senators, I ask that you stand up for us. As lawmakers and leaders, you have the power
to shape public opinion. Your words carry weight. When others scapegoat or demean people
because of who they are, use your power to say that is wrong.
So many have asked Sikhs to simply blame Muslims for attacks against our community or just
say “We are not Muslim.” But we won’t blame anyone else. An attack on one of us is an attack
on all of us.
I also want to be a part of the solution. That’s why I want to be a law enforcement officer like Lt.
Brian Murphy, who saved so many lives on August 5, 2012. I want to protect other people from
what happened to my mother. I want to combat hate – not just against Sikhs but against all
people. Senators, I know what happened at Oak Creek was not an isolated incident. I fear it may
happen again if we don’t stand up and do something.
I don’t want anyone to suffer what we have suffered. I want to build a world where all people
can live, work, and worship in America in peace.
Because you see, despite everything, I still believe in the American dream. In my mother’s
memory, I ask that you stand up for it with me. Today. And in the days to come.
Thank you for considering my testimony.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 28, 2012 in African American News

 

Tags: ,

Bust through your plateau

michael jarosky, boot camp

Boot Camp

Michael Jarosky is a (former) chubby strategy consultant from the US. He now works as a personal trainer in Sydney CBD.

If you feel like you're doing the right thing in the gym, but you're not losing any weight, it could be time for a rethink.If you feel like you’re doing the right thing in the gym, but you’re not losing any weight, it could be time for a rethink. Photo: Quentin Jones

Hitting your training plateau is like bumping into that glass ceiling at work – it’s frustrating, seemingly invisible, and difficult to overcome.

But you can shatter that plateau if you make some changes in your training and lifestyle. Thoreau once said ‘Things do not change; we change,’ And that is true in the gym and the kitchen. Whether you’re strength training, running, or just trying to lose some weight, breakthrough your plateau with the 9 tips below.

Strength Training

If you are looking to increase strength, altering your sets and reps might not be enough. Try these three tips:

1. Rest and rejuvenate – If you’re pushing some serious weights, a week off from strength or hypertrophy training is a vacation for your body. Take a week off and let your muscles repair. However, don’t use this rest time as an excuse for a week on the booze. Instead employ some active rest – go for some hikes, do some yoga, and get plenty of sleep. Your body will come back stronger.

2. Work surrounding muscles – If you’re no longer progressing with activities such as the bench press, it could be that your secondary movers are weak (triceps and shoulders). Scale down your sets and reps on the bench and instead isolate your shoulders and triceps to build strength, then head back to the bench press and break through your one rep max.

3. Strengthen your grip – Fat Gripz are pretty new in Australia, and by widening the barbell/dumbbell, some experts believe they can target your weakest link – your forearms and grip.

Running

Can’t break your best time in the City2Surf or the half/full marathon? Then change the way you train. Many runners train by hitting the pavement for a fixed distance at a constant speed, but you need to mix it up if you want to break your runner’s plateau. Here’s how:

1. French physiologist Veronique Billat developed a type of high intensity interval training to give a VO2max boost called ’30-30′. At a speed which you could hold for 6 minutes in race conditions, run for 30 seconds, then bring it down to a jogging pace for 30 seconds. Repeat up to 20 times, or until you cannot hold your fast pace any longer.

2. Stair running and hill running strengthens the muscles in your quads, hamstrings, glutes, and calves. If you’re solely running on flat surfaces, hitting the hills and stairs will increase your anaerobic performance and also improve your lactate tolerance.

3. Running does not give you a free pass from the weight room. Squats, lunges, and deadlifts will strengthen your legs, and strengthen you as a runner.

Weight loss

If you feel like you’re doing the right thing in the gym and the kitchen, but you’re not losing any weight, it could be time to rethink your strategy.

1. In the gym, if you’re only doing cardio, then mix in some weights. If you’re only doing weights, then start running. Swim, cycle, play tennis, do some fitness classes, or anything else you enjoy. The idea is to mix it up. The body will stay the same unless you throw something new at it.

2. Sometimes it takes a little bit of pain to bring about the biggest change, so it’s time to increase the intensity of your workouts. Whatever you do to sweat out some calories, make sure you’re doing it with intensity.

3. Change to a healthier diet. Not many Australians eat the daily, required amount of fruit and vegetables and most still consume too much sugar, alcohol, and processed food. If your weight is stuck, examine your diet and where you can make better choices for your body.

Some medical professionals feel motivation is far more important than education in reversing obesity. So while we all inherently know what to do, the motivation to get it done is lacking. If you’re at your weight, strength, or running plateau, it’s time to re-commit, find your inspiration, and motivate yourself to busting through and reaching new goals.

 

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 28, 2012 in African American Health

 

Tags: ,

Don’t Call Generation Y ‘Cheap’: They’re Conscious, Creative, But Coddled

Twenty-somethings are getting a bad rap

 

Generation Y can’t catch a break. First, they weredeclared entirely non-existent, but instead a made-up cohort created by market researchers. Then, by those who acknowledged their early 1980s births, the Millennials were deemed the most likely to be stuck in the lowest-paying jobs available (more specifically as retail associates—a gig that can rake in an average of less than $20,000 a year). Subsequently, and not surprisingly, the Atlantic named them the “cheapest” generation.

Granted, the economic crisis has had a hand in their fruitless job searches and selective spending habits, but other demographic factors are allowing Millennials to live their lives the way their parents, well, didn’t.

“I wouldn’t call them the ‘cheapest generation,'” said Tina Wells, author of “Chasing Youth Culture And Getting It Right, “but more so, the most ‘cost conscious.’ Regardless of the current economic climate, online shopping has allowed Gen Y to search for products, accessories, etc. at a reduced price. In the same regard, because of the economy, they are, more than ever, looking for these bargain deals. There’s also the reoccurring trend of ‘DIY’—or ‘do it yourself’—fashion that’s big with this generation this season. Why buy, when you can make it and wear it yourself?”

Additionally, as Atlantic writers Derek Thompson and Jordan Weissman reported, there are companies that promote and participate in the growing trend of a “sharing economy” like Zipcar, as well as Airbnb, an online service that matches travelers looking for short-term accommodations with private parties, and thredUp, a site where parents can buy and sell kids’ used clothing.

And as smartphones begin to best cars as young people’s big purchases, Sheryl Connelly, head of global consumer trends at Ford, admitted, “You no longer need to feel connected to your friends with a car when you have this technology that’s so ubiquitous, it transcends time and space.”

“They aren’t buying cars,” said Dan Schawbel, Generation Y workplace and career expert. “Many have moved back in with their parents. They have been delaying major life milestones like getting married and buying a home.”

Ironically, it’s their parents—and other elders who have already met those milestones—that are becoming a source of conflict in the success of Generation Y. In 2008, the “workplace generation wars” made headlines; three years later, it got more personal between “Gen Y vs. Baby Boomers.”  And earlier this year, TIME asked “Who would you rather hire?,”written by Schawbel, himself.

“Gen Y has completed their education, but the older generation of Baby Boomers have not left [their jobs] yet due to their inability to retire,” said Sherri Elliott-Yeary, author of “Ties to Tattoos: Turning Generational Differences into a Competitive Advantage.” “They no longer have a 401K, they have a 201K plan and medical care has gotten so costly, so we have a backlog of educated Millennials with college degrees—and some with large student loans—that are still living at home, especially when they earn on average $9 an hour in retail or waitressing.”

However, when they’re not battling it out at a place of business, it’s the parents’ constant coddling that becomes the conflict. In March, US News reported that at least 1 in 4 twenty-somethings feel comfortable moving back home after college graduation because of “‘helicopter parenting’ and continued closeness with their parents.” The article called it a “benefit.”

 

But Elliott-Yeary sees only an adverse effect in parents’ reactive rescuing. “Many Millennials grew up thinking they were good at everything because helicopter parents never let them try something and fail,” she said, “which is how we learn what we are good at and what we aren’t as we develop our career goals. So, many Millennials obtained degrees in a field that they are not really passionate about or interested in and it’s [become] easier [for them] to work a lower level job without the stress of choice of what to do when they grow up.”

There’s little denial that Generation Y was hit hardest by the economic crisis. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, theunemployment rate among Millennials stands at 9 percent—that’s 0.8 percent higher than the national average of 8.2. Still, Schawbel shows little mercy.

“Gen Y has to be accountable for their own career and lives,” he said. “They can’t rely on anything or anyone to be successful. They need to create their own jobs, possibly start companies and never give up. It doesn’t look like the economy is going to turn around anytime soon, so Gen Y has to stop being entitled and take their future in their own hands.”

To their advantage, however, is their creative nature and computer knowledge. Wells is keeping the faith.

“Millennials are tech savvy and conscious of the necessary steps to live life on their own terms,” she said. “So, the retail associate today could end up being the next fashion mogul.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 28, 2012 in African American News

 

Tags:

Big Brother still watching: Internet censorship on the up, report says

By Paul Armstrong, CNN
 Fri September 28, 2012
Chinese censors blocked information on the blind activist at the center of a diplomatic storm this year.
Chinese censors blocked information on the blind activist at the center of a diplomatic storm this year.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Report looks at barriers to access, limits on content in 47 countries across the globe
  • Authoritarian regimes increasing restrictions as online activism increases
  • China has largest number of Internet users and most sophisticated controls
  • Many countries fear social media-led revolutions seen in Egypt, Tunisia

Hong Kong (CNN) — Draconian laws, brutal attacks against bloggers and politically motivated surveillance are among the biggest threats to Internet freedom emerging in the last two years, according to a new report from free speech advocates, Freedom House.

“Freedom on the Net 2012: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media,” looked at barriers to access, limits on content, and violations of user rights in 47 countries across the globe. Estonia was rated as having the greatest degree of Internet freedom, while Iran, Cuba and China were viewed as the most restrictive.

While social media was key in the uprising in Egypt, censorship there continues apace, says Freedom House, a U.S.-based independent watchdog organization.

Although online activism is increasing, the report said authoritarian regimes were employing a wider and increasingly sophisticated arsenal of countermeasures.

Read more: The full report

According to Freedom House, China has the world’s largest population of Internet users, yet the authorities operate the most sophisticated system of censorship. Its “great firewall” has become notorious for literally shutting down Internet “chatter” it views as sensitive. Earlier this year, censors blocked related search terms to prevent the public from obtaining news on prominent human rights activist Chen Guangcheng, who caused a diplomatic storm when he escaped house arrest to seek refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

 e

Major web portals and social networking sites, though not state-owned, have had to comply with strict government censorship rules — or risk being shut down. After launching a campaign to clean up “rampant online rumors,” Chinese authorities in March ordered the country’s leading micro-blogging sites — including Sina Weibo — to disable their comment function for three days. In China, bloggers are also required to register their real names — though it’s not clear how many have complied with the rules.

“It’s a typical response by officials and quite a successful strategy in making it extremely difficult to spread information beyond some small circles of activists,” Jeremy Goldkorn, a leading commentator on China’s social media, told CNN at the time.

Freedom House claims Beijing’s influence as an “incubator for sophisticated restrictions” has not gone unnoticed, with governments such as Belarus, Uzbekistan, and Iran using China as a model for their own Internet controls.

Unrest across the Middle East prompted increased censorship, arrests, and violence against bloggers as authoritarian regimes look to quell calls for reform. Social media was widely accepted to have played a key role in popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Fearing a similar “revolution” in Saudi Arabia, the authorities there took immediate steps to respond to what they regarded as a national security threat.

According to the Freedom House report, the Saudi government has issued warnings banning protests — even using the BlackBerry multi-media message service (MMS) to discourage protesters from participating in demonstrations. They say the authorities have detained and intimidated hundreds of online political activists and online commentators, blocked and filtered sensitive political, religious or pornographic content from entering the Saudi Internet, and even recruited supporters online to campaign against calls for protests.

Egypt’s “revolution,” which ended the three-decade rule of Hosni Mubarak, was widely known as the Facebook or Twitter revolution because of the way activists used social media to spread their message, despite government countermeasures such as arresting dissidents, periodically blocking Internet access and restricting cellular networks.

However, the reports says Mubarak-era censorship has continued in Egypt under the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), which took control until the election of Mohamed Morsy as president in June. Mobile phones, the Internet, and social media remained under vigorous surveillance, bandwidth speeds were throttled during specific events, while SCAF-affiliated commentators manipulated online discussions. According to Freedom House, activists and bloggers have been intimidated, beaten, or tried in military courts for “insulting the military power” or “disturbing social peace.”

After taking office in June, President Morsy pledged to work to free Egyptians subjected to unjust detention. That month, Egyptian newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm reported that he had ordered the formation of a panel of Interior Ministry, Public Prosecution, and military judiciary officials to consider the cases of civilians detained by the military.

But this week’s report warns the future direction of Internet freedom in Egypt remains uncertain despite Morsy’s election.

It’s a typical response by officials and quite a successful strategy in making it extremely difficult to spread information beyond some small circles of activists.
Jeremy Goldkorn

Freedom House also highlighted countries seen as vulnerable to increased restrictions on freedom of speech.

In Pakistan, the report noted that successive military and civilian governments have exerted greater control over Internet use, often citing national security or religious reasons for doing so. On several occasions the authorities have blocked access to services such as YouTube, Flickr, Facebook and various blogs — often under pressure from religious groups.

Another country on this watch list is Russia, where the report says Internet-inspired anti-government protestslast year have prompted a desire on the part of the Kremlin to tighten up on its controls.

“The findings clearly show that threats to Internet freedom are becoming more diverse,” said Sanja Kelly, project director for Freedom on the Net at Freedom House.

“As authoritarian rulers see that blocked websites and high-profile arrests draw local and international condemnation, they are turning to murkier — but no less dangerous — methods for controlling online conversations.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 28, 2012 in African American News

 

Tags: ,

JAMAICA NEWSWEEKLY For the week ending September 28th, 2012

—————————————-
THIS WEEK”S SUMMARY
—————————————-

NEW INVESTMENTS TO CREATE JOBS—09/22/12
Portia Simpson Miller, Jamaica’s Prime Minister, has announced that the government has obtained a number of investment opportunities that will create several new projects, which in turn, will create about 7,000 jobs. The projects have a value estimated at J$7.5 billion, the projects involve Dolphin Cove Group, West Kingston Power Partners, Hinduja Global Solutions, Vistaprint, and Sutherland Global. The companies will create ICT project, animal attractions, a large energy plant, and a call center.

SPECIAL RUM CREATED TO CELEBRATE NATION’S  100TH ANNIVERSARY—09/22/12
A special Appleton Rum edition, recently barreled at an event attended by Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller and several of her predecessors, will be opened in 2062 at the 100th anniversary celebration of Jamaican independence. The special blend includes the 2012 product and some of the 50-year-old Reserve barreled in 1962 for the 50th anniversary of independence held in 2012. There are nine barrels of the run, each of which is labeled with a plaque to identify the Prime Minister who filled it.

JAMAICA’S OLYMPIC ATHLETES TO BE REWARDED—09/23/12
The athletes who represented Jamaica in the 2012 Olympics will receive rewards for their efforts, says Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller. She stated that a special committee has been established to handle the matter and that further action will be taken once the committee’s report has been provided. Jamaica had its best Olympic performance in history at the 2012 Games, winning a record-setting 12 medals. Celebrations to honor the athletes will occur during the weekend of National Heroes’ Day in October 2012.

JAMAICANS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR 2014 U.S. DIVERSITY VISA—09/24/12
The United States has announced that Jamaicans will not be eligible to apply for the 2014 Diversity Visa Program. According to the U.S. Department of State, individuals from nations that sent over 50,000 immigrants to the U.S. during the previous five-year period are ineligible to participate in the program. Other nations that cannot participate in the program include Haiti, Mexico, Pakistan, South Korea, and Vietnam.

GOLDING SAYS AVERAGE JAMAICANS WILL BENEFIT FROM CCJ—09/25/12
Mark Golding, Jamaica’s Minister of Justice and Senator, says that average Jamaicans will benefit from accession to the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). The average Jamaican cannot afford to take a case to the Privy Council, Golding said, and in cases other than those involving the death penalty have difficulty taking a case beyond the local Court of Appeal. The CCJ will be more accessible and affordable to average people.

BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT STUDIES DEPARTMENTS AT UWI TO MERGE—09/26/12
Professor Paul G. Simmonds will head the new Mona School of Business and Management (MSBM) at the University of the West Indies. The school has been formed via a merger of the business school and the management studies department. The merger went into effect August 1, 2012. For the present, the two programs will operate from separate facilities. The new school is the first in the Caribbean region to provide both undergraduate and graduate courses, and it is the largest business school in the region as well.

PRIME MINISTER SPEAKS TO UNITED NATIONS—09/27/12
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller addressed the United Nations General Assembly in New York, telling dignitaries from around the world about her hope that all peoples will one day work and live together in peace, security, and prosperity. Her 30-minute address covered food security, HIV/AIDS, the abuse of women, and children’s poverty. Simpson Miller also called for ending the economic and trade embargo on Cuba.

MAJOR PROTEST SCHEDULED TO CONDEM VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN—09/28/12
Jamaicans are planning a protest demonstration to condemn violence against women following an incident in which five females, including an eight-year-old girl, were raped at their St. James home. Some 15 women’s groups and citizen organizations will hold a nationwide protest against sexual abuse and other violence against women. They are calling for local citizens to wear black as a sign of solidarity. The initiative was developed after Sandra Falconer, Jamaica’s Information Minister, held a meeting ordered following remarks in which Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller made public condemnation of the attacks.

———————————————
JAMAICAN DIASPORA NEWS
———————————————

QUEEN JUBILEE TIME CAPSULE TO INCLUDE JAMAICAN MEMORIES—09/22/12
Images of Prince Harry’s visit to Jamaica are now part of a time capsule project that is designed to become a Jubilee gift to Queen Elizabeth II. The images include the Prince receiving dance lessons from a Jamaican woman. Prince Harry will contribute a personal letter in which he expresses his thanks to the Jamaican government and a photo depicting him “winning” a race against Jamaican sprint champion Usain Bolt. The time capsule project calls for all people, including those in Commonwealth nations, to share their memories.

JAMAICAN MAN HELD IN DEATHS OF AMERICAN COUPLE IN ST. MAARTEN—09/24/12
Authorities in St. Maarten say that a Jamaican man has been charged in the killings of an American couple from South Carolina who were found in their beachfront condo. The man, 28, is the only suspect in the murders to date. Michael and Thelma King of Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, both in their 50s, were found dead in their St. Maarten condo, apparently stabbed to death. The suspect resisted arrest, wounding a police officer during his capture.

SIMPSON MILLER TO ADDRESS UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY—09/26/12
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller will deliver a policy statement to the 67th Session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. She joined with other world leaders at the opening ceremonies, which included appearances by Barack Obama, President of the United States, and the heads of Serbia France, and Brazil. Simpson Miller also attended a luncheon hosted by Ban Ki Moon, UN Secretary General, where she received congratulations for Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence.

PLANNING BEGINS FOR 2013 DIASPORA CONFERENCE—09/27/12
The Preparatory Committee for the Fifth Biennial Jamaican Diaspora Conference held its first meeting to plan the 2013 event at the offices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade in Kingston. It was chaired by Arnaldo Brown, Minister of State with responsibility for Diaspora affairs. A new chairman of the committee, Richard Powel, president and CEO of the Victoria Mutual Building Society, was installed as well: The conference is scheduled for June 16-19, 2013.

————————————————-
CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
————————————————-

OVER 4,000 POUNDS OF COCAINE SEIZED OFF PUERTO RICO—09/22/12

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO FESTIVAL SHOWS CARIBBEAN, INTERNATIONAL FILMS—09/23/12

SECURITY OFFICERS  STOP ROBBERY ATTEMPT AT BAHAMAS RESORT—09/25/12

ARUBA, DOMINICANS TIED, WIN FOR BARBADOS IN QUALIFIERS—09/26/12

$2.79 BILLION IN PLEDGES TO HAITI RELEASED BY UNITED NATIONS—09/27/12

ST.LUCIA AVERTS UNION SHUT-DOWN IN HOTEL INDUSTRY—09/28/12

Visit Caribbeantopnews.com for the weekly Caribbean News Summary, Caribbean Events & Announcements and Caribbean Recipes.

———————————————
BUSINESS NEWS SUMMARY
———————————————

HYLTON CALLS FOR EXPORTERS TO MODERNIZE—09/22/12
Anthony Hylton, Jamaica’s Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, wants exporters to use the loan facility provided by the National Export-Import Bank of Jamaica Ltd. to modernize their plants. Hylton noted that business owners would be able to borrow up to US$500,000 to buy new equipment and improve their facilities through the EX-IM loan. Exporters have been slow to take advantage of the loans because companies must conduct audits to qualify, and many are still in the process of doing so, said Lisa Bell, managing director of the EX-IM Bank.

NESTLE MAKES NEW INVESTMENT IN JAMAICA—09/23/12
Nestle is investing in a new production line at the Jamaican facility that makes Supligen, a milk-based drink favored by consumers in the Caribbean region. The drink is marketed as a sustained energy-release drink and contains Actigen-E, a blend of vitamins and minerals created by Nestle to optimize energy performance. The investment totals US$8 million in the firm’s Bybrook factory near Linstead. It will allow for increased production and provide a new aluminum can designed for better cooling.

JAMAICAN AIRPORTS TO COMPETE WITH HUBS IN MIAMI—09/26/12
Jamaica is attempting to position its two international airports as alternatives to Miami International Airport and is moving ahead with plans for privatization. Miami is a major transit hub for millions of travelers. Dr. Omar Davies, Transport Minister, has urged investors to consider Jamaican airports as an alternative hub to the already very busy Miami location. Jamaica could have a significant role in easing the movement of travelers throughout the Latin American, Caribbean, and South American areas.

FOREIGN COMPANY TAX EXEMPTION PASSED—09/27/12
The House of Representatives in Jamaica has passed legislation designed to provide a tax incentive to officers of international firms that establish head offices in Jamaica. The Income Tax (Amendment) Act was spearheaded by Dr. Peter Phillips, Minister of Finance. It will provide an income tax exemption for non-residents performing head-office activities in the country. Companies may apply for certificates to obtain designations as situating their head offices in Jamaica, thus becoming eligible for the tax incentive.

———————————————————————-
CARIBBEAN TECHNOLOGY NEWS SUMMARY provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
———————————————————————–

JAMAICANS TO HAVE MORE ACCESS TO COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY—09/22/12

JAMAICA’S SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERIENCES STUDIED—09/23/12

PESTICIDES MUST BE HANDLED SAFELY, SAYS PCA—09/24/12

CUBAN CANCER DRUG TO BE SOLD IN JAMAICA—09/25/12

Visit Caribbeantopnews.com for the weekly Caribbean News Summary, Caribbean Events & Announcements and Caribbean Recipes.

—————————————————–
ENTERTAINMENT
—————————————————–

JAMAICAN POET CLAUDE MCKAY ENTERS ENGLISH LITERATURECANON—09/23/12
Claude McKay, a Jamaican poet, has been received into the canon of great literature and poetry available in the English language. His poem “If We Must Die” was quoted by Sir Winston Churchill as h has e tried to inspire the British in World War II. Professor Winston James of Columbia University researched McKay for his book entitled “A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay’s Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion.” While writing the book, James discovered an unknown manuscript by McKay that was written in 1941. This manuscript “Amiable with Big Teeth: A Novel of the Love Affair between the Communists and the Poor Black Sheep of Harlem,” will be published with the permission of McKay’s estate. Although claimed by the United States as a black American, McKay was born and bred in Jamaica and served in the Jamaica Constabulary Force. He died in 1948, after influencing many writers of the Harlem Renaissance, including Langston Hughes.

LOUIS SIMPSON DIES AT 89—09/24/12
The poet Louis Simpson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1964, died in Stony Brook, New York, at the age of 89. Simpson was a native Jamaican of Scottish and Russian heritage, and was described as similar to Walt Whitman for his ability to use poetry to tell stories. He was an assistant professor of English at the University of California in Berkeley when he won the Pulitzer. In the years before his death, he suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, according to his daughter Anne B. Simpson.

JCDC TO CAPITLIZE ON SUCCESS OF ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS—09/25/12
The Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC) wants to capitalize on the successful staging activities surrounding the celebrations of Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence. Marjorie Leyden-Vernon, JCDC director of field services, says the Commission plans to maintain the Jamaica 50 parish committees that had been formed to help design and implement celebrations in the parishes. The JCDC wants to keep the strong level of support for these activities after the 50th anniversary year is over.

VYBZ KARTEL SPEAKING LOUDLY FROM JAIL—09/27/12
Vybz Kartel, dancehall reggae artiste, is serving time in detention, but that has not stopped him from speaking his mind. An online forum and countdown to his incarceration will be held on September 29, 2012, and a message from Kartel will be released to the public every day until the 29th.The 29th marks one year since Adidja Palmer, known as Vybz Kartel, was detained in New Kingston. He has also written a book called “Voice of the Jamaican Ghetto,” which he wrote together with Michael Dawson, a Garveyite. The book describes the plight of the poor in Jamaica.

——————
SPORTS
——————

SUNSHINE GIRLS BEAT ENGLAND—09/25/12
Jamaica’s Sunshine Girls defeated their arch-rival England with a score of 49-44 in a three-Test series at Echo Arena in Liverpool, England. The team was led to its victory by Jhaniele Fowler, who had 32 goals from 37 attempts. The Jamaicans led the match from the beginning and had a 14-12 lead at the end of the first quarter. In the fourth quarter, they were outscored 13-11 by England, but they came back to secure the win.

“OFFICE” PLAYING SURFACE OF CONCERN TO OFFICIALS—09/26/12
International football officials who were inspecting the field at National Stadium before the recent home World Cup Qualifier against the United States on September 7, 2012, were concerned about the field’s playing surface. The stadium has been known as the “Office” since it seemed almost impossible for opponents to win against the primarily local squad of Jamaicans during the “Road to France” campaign. Horace Reid of the Jamaica Football Federation admitted the less-than -perfect surface could work against the Reggae Boyz as they attempt to gain a place in the 2014 World Cup tournament in Brazil

GAYLE CONFIDENT ABOUT WEST INDIES CHANCES—09/27/12
Chris Gayle, opening batsman for the West Indies cricket team, is optimistic about the ability of the Windies to make the finals of the ICC World Twenty20 tournament underway in Sri Lanka. The team’s main concern was to make the Super Eight, so now it is confident that it will do well, Gayle said. The team members are more relaxed after playing the first two games.

WOLMER’S BOYS CONTINUE THEIR WINNING WAYS—09/28/12
Wolmer’s Boys are moving on by scoring goal after goal, defeating Jose Marti 5-0 in the Group F match at the ISSA/Digicel/Gatorade Manning Cup. Kamario Osbourne scored in the fifth, 40th and 54th  minutes, while Jorginho James, who moved from Kingston College to Wolmer’s, also scored his fourth goal of the season in the 68th minute. Coach Ludlow Bernard is more than satisfied with the team’s performance. It is the top scoring team in the Corporate Area.

 

Tags: ,

CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending September 28th, 2012

OVER 4,000 POUNDS OF COCAINE SEIZED OFF PUERTO RICO—09/22/12
According to a joint strike force comprising Puerto Rican and United States law enforcement, more than 4,000 pounds have been seized off the coast thus far in the month of September 2012. The latest seizure involved 2,2023 pounds found on a boat off Maunabo off the southern coast of Puerto Rico by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations agency and members of the Caribbean Corridor Strike Force. The operation resulted in the arrest of three nations from the Dominican Republic. It had an estimated street value of over $22 million.

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO FESTIVAL SHOWS CARIBBEAN, INTERNATIONAL FILMS—09/23/12
Trinidad and Tobago are hosting the seventh annual film festival, featuring entertainments that celebrate Caribbean, African, Latin American, and Canadian films. The festival began with a screening of “Marley,” the documentary about Bob Marley, the legendary reggae star. A total of 175 films will be shown between September 18 and October 2, 2012.

SECURITY OFFICERS  STOP ROBBERY ATTEMPT AT BAHAMAS RESORT—09/25/12
An attempted robbery at a well-known resort in the Bahamas was halted due to the actions of security personnel. Three individuals attempted to rob a cashier at the casino of the Atlantis resort. They used pepper spray to incapacitate the cashier before trying to take money from the cage. Patrons did not see the robbery attempt because it occurred in an employee-only area. Security personnel caught the thieves, who were then taken into custody by the Royal Bahamas Police Force.

ARUBA, DOMINICANS TIED, WIN FOR BARBADOS IN QUALIFIERS—09/26/12
The Dominican Republic and Aruba played to a 2-2 tie in the opening match of the Group 4 Caribbean Cup qualifying tournament. Barbados, which was hosting the event, won its double-header, defeating Dominica 1 to nothing.

$2.79 BILLION IN PLEDGES TO HAITI RELEASED BY UNITED NATIONS—09/27/12
The Office of the Special Envoy for Haiti at the United Nations announced that more than half of the total money pledged to help rebuild Haiti after the 2010 earthquake has been release. Of the total of $5.33 billion in pledges from donors, $2.79 billion, or 52.3 percent of the money designated for recovery between 2010 and 2012 has already been disbursed. Most of the money was released through grants to the government of Haiti, non-governmental groups, and private contracting firms.

ST.LUCIA AVERTS UNION SHUT-DOWN IN HOTEL INDUSTRY—09/28/12
The St. Lucia Hotel and Tourism Association was relieved when the shut-down threatened by the National Workers Union was averted. The union had announced its shut-down in response to plans by the government to apply the Value Added Tax (VAT) to service charges on employees of the hospitality industry. The strike was called off when the administration of Dr. Kenny Anthony told the workers they will not have to pay VAT on service charges.

GOLDING SAYS AVERAGE JAMAICANS WILL BENEFIT FROM CCJ—09/25/12
Mark Golding, Jamaica’s Minister of Justice and Senator, says that average Jamaicans will benefit from accession to the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). The average Jamaican cannot afford to take a case to the Privy Council, Golding said, and in cases other than those involving the death penalty have difficulty taking a case beyond the local Court of Appeal. The CCJ will be more accessible and affordable to average people.

BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT STUDIES DEPARTMENTS AT UWI TO MERGE—09/26/12
Professor Paul G. Simmonds will head the new Mona School of Business and Management (MSBM) at the University of the West Indies. The school has been formed via a merger of the business school and the management studies department. The merger went into effect August 1, 2012. For the present, the two programs will operate from separate facilities. The new school is the first in the Caribbean region to provide both undergraduate and graduate courses, and it is the largest business school in the region as well.

PRIME MINISTER SPEAKS TO UNITED NATIONS—09/27/12
Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller addressed the United Nations General Assembly in New York, telling dignitaries from around the world about her hope that all peoples will one day work and live together in peace, security, and prosperity. Her 30-minute address covered food security, HIV/AIDS, the abuse of women, and children’s poverty. Simpson Miller also called for ending the economic and trade embargo on Cuba.

MAJOR PROTEST SCHEDULED TO CONDEM VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN—09/28/12
Jamaicans are planning a protest demonstration to condemn violence against women following an incident in which five females, including an eight-year-old girl, were raped at their St. James home. Some 15 women’s groups and citizen organizations will hold a nationwide protest against sexual abuse and other violence against women. They are calling for local citizens to wear black as a sign of solidarity. The initiative was developed after Sandra Falconer, Jamaica’s Information Minister, held a meeting ordered following remarks in which Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller made public condemnation of the attacks.

 

Tags:

CARIBBEAN TECHNOLOGY NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending September 28th, 2012

JAMAICANS TO HAVE MORE ACCESS TO COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY—09/22/12
By the end of 2012, many more Jamaicans across the island will have better and easier access to information technology due to government efforts to implement its Community Access Points (CAP) and broadband imitative. Julian Robinson, Minister of State for Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, noted that under the CAP program, community centers and schools are receiving computer equipment and high-speed Internet service. Some 85 access points have already been completed,, while 57 are in progress, and 123 more are under consideration.

JAMAICA’S SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERIENCES STUDIED—09/23/12
Dr. Lloyd Waller, lecturer at the University of the West Indies, describes the book “Streaming” as a study of social media and mobile lifestyles that captures the interconnectedness of modern youth. The book was written by Dr. Marcia Forbes. Waller said the book offers a “scholarly and empirical account” of the experience, behavior, and discourse in Jamaica concerning the use of online social media by young people. The book is being used in several classes at the university.

PESTICIDES MUST BE HANDLED SAFELY, SAYS PCA—09/24/12
The Pesticides Control Authority (PCA) plans to educate Jamaican residents in how to properly manage pesticides in order to reduce the hazards to people and the environment that result from misuse. September 23 through 29, 2012, has been designated “Pesticides Awareness Week.” The PCA wants to ensure that children in particular are protected from danger. Every year several children are hospitalized because of mismanagement of pesticides by adults, said Michael Ramsay, PCA Registrar.

CUBAN CANCER DRUG TO BE SOLD IN JAMAICA—09/25/12
Medimpex, a drug distribution firm based in Hungary, has been given the exclusive rights to import and sell Vidatox, the Cuban cancer drug, to Jamaicans. The drug is produced from the venom of the Blue scorpion, which is found exclusively in Cuba. It will be made available to Jamaican pharmacies by the end of October 2012. The company sees opportunities for drug sales in Jamaica because cancer is a leading cause of death on the island. The Jamaican Ministry of Health approved the introduction of Vidatox for sale in the country in June 2012.

 

Tags:

 
%d bloggers like this: