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Monthly Archives: June 2013

Beat the heat with these 10 Summer Driving Tips

 

With the arrival of summer, more drivers will hit the American highways for summer vacations. At Valvoline Instant Oil ChangeSM service centers, we want to share a few Summer Driving Tips to help prepare your vehicle and ensure it is in optimal driving condition for your summer getaway or your day-to-day driving in hotter weather conditions:

1. Change your motor oil regularly
Regular oil changes with the correct grade of motor oil can improve gas mileage up to two percent.* Synthetic oils are best for high temperature driving conditions and for added protection when towing.

2. Check your tire pressure
Keeping your tires properly inflated can help improve gas mileage up to three percent.* Be sure to check your tire pressure before you begin driving for the day. This allows you to get a cold pressure reading (the number commonly referenced in your owner’s manual).

3. Clean your fuel system
This helps improve fuel economy and maximize engine performance by removing dirt and deposits from the fuel system.

4. Use cruise control on highways
This will help you maintain a constant speed, which in most cases helps improve fuel economy.

5. Do not idle
It requires less gas to restart a vehicle than to let it idle.

6. Park in the shade or a garage
The sun zaps fuel from your gas tank. Parking in the shade or garage will lessen the amount of evaporative emissions.

7. Check your cooling system (radiator)
It protects your engine from overheating in hot summer conditions. Follow your owner’s manual for regular maintenance.

8. Check your serpentine belt
Replacing the serpentine belt when needed helps prevent breakdowns. It keeps your vehicle’s power steering, alternator, water pump and AC running.

9. Check your air conditioning system
Nothing makes the summer heat more unbearable than traveling with an air conditioning system that will not cool properly.

10. Check your windshield wipers and wiper fluid
The combination of bad wipers and a summer downpour can leave you with no view of the road. Be sure you have plenty of wiper fluid to help keep your windshield clear of dirt and debris.

Also, remember to follow the vehicle maintenance procedures outlined in your owner’s manual. These can help improve your fuel economy and prolong the life of your vehicle. The following should be included:

• Check your transmission fluid: Changing the fluid when needed helps restore your vehicle’s operation by protecting the gears from grinding.
• Rotate your tires regularly: This prevents uneven wear, which can shorten the life of your tires. It also improves vehicle handling and traction.
• Check your gearbox fluid: Changing the fluid when needed restores additives to protect the gears from grinding. This is especially important for four-wheel drive vehicles because they have three gear boxes.

Follow these Summer Driving Tips and your vehicle’s regular maintenance schedule to get optimal driving conditions and good fuel economy for your vehicle this summer. So, get out there and enjoy your summer vacation, or at least, you can feel better about driving during the dog days of summer. To learn more or to find a Valvoline Instant Oil Change near you, visit vioc.com.

SMService mark, Ashland or its subsidiaries, registered in various countries
* As cited from the U.S. Department of Energy at fueleconomy.gov

 

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CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending June 28th, 2013

FILM PRODUCTION BIG IN CARIBBEAN—06/22/13
The Caribbean region is increasingly sought out as a location for film production. In the past, many films have used countries like the Dominican Republic as backdrops for their stories, but never became the chief destination for filmmakers. However, this is changing, and the Dominican Republic, which appointed its first national film commission in 2012, is now in a position to offer film firms significant breaks as a lure.
FIRST CARIBBEAN NASCAR DRIVER HOPES TO REMAIN IN THE LEAD—06/23/13
Victor Gonzalez, a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and the first Caribbean driver in a Sprint Cup race, is trying to win a place in history. He will drive in the Toyota/Save Mart 3/50 at Sonoma Raceway. By doing so, he is participating in the biggest and most popular of the sport’s professional series. Gonzalez has been racing for about 20 years. He was born in Puerto Rico and raised in the Dominican Republic. He wants to encourage others in the Caribbean to pursue racing as a sport.

HAITI RECEIVES GRANT TO IMPROVE WATER SERVICES—06/24/13
Haiti has received a grant from the Inter-American Development Bank to improve services for drinking water in Port-au-Prince, the nation’s capital city. The grant totals $35.5 million and will support a program that was developed in 2010 in partnership between the bank and the Spanish Cooperation Fund in Water and Sanitation in Latin America and the Caribbean. The water systems in Haiti are inadequate and foster the spread of waterborne diseases like cholera.

CARIBBEAN NATIONS WORRY ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE DANGERS—06/25/13
Jamaica is being impacted by rising water levels of just eight inches. These few inches have caused parts of the island to disappear, which represents a danger to people’s jobs and lives. According to Conrad Douglas, a Jamaican scientist, some have predicted that Barbuda could disappear in 40 years, but Jamaica is already seeing its environment impacted by climate change in the area of Pedro Cays. One of the four cays has already disappeared, endangering seabird nesting areas and species of turtles. The area is the top producer and exporter of Queen Conch in the Caribbean.

SUNRISE AIRWAYS TO EXPAND SERVICE TO JAMAICA, TURKS AND CAICOS—06/26/13
Sunrise Airways of Haiti is planning to expand its services to include Kingston, Jamaica, and Providenciales in Turks and Caicos. Sunrise operates 19-seat planes and is served by hub operations in San Juan. The startup airline was created in 2009 and launched scheduled flights to Haiti in 2012.

DRUG TRAFFICKING INCREASES IN CARIBBEAN, SAYS U.S.—06/27/13
Assistant United States Secretary of State William Brownfield stated that there has been an increase in the amount of illegal drugs that enters the U.S. from the Caribbean. He said this indicates that drug cartels are looking for new routes as authorities clamp down on Mexican and Central American pathways. In 2012, nine percent of all illegal drugs entering the U.S. came from the Caribbean. In 2011, only between four and five percent of the drugs came in through that route.

GAY RIGHTS ACTIVIST CHALLENGES JAMAICA’S ANTI-SODOMY LAW—06/25/13
Javed Jaghai, an outreach worker for the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals & Gays, the only gay rights group in the country, received his first court hearing in his attempt to challenge a colonial-era anti-sodomy law on constitutional grounds. The 1854 law was heard in Jamaica’s Supreme Court, which gave the nation’s attorney general until the middle of September 2013 to respond to the challenge. The next hearing on the matter is scheduled for October 2013.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS RETURN TO WORK—06/26/13
Jamaica’s air traffic controllers returned to work after holding a “sick-out” in protest of pay arrangements. The two-day protest action required the civil aviation agency to call in supervisors to operate the control towers; safety was not compromised at the island’s airfields and international airports as a result. The Jamaica Air Traffic Controllers’ Association continues to demand an increase in salary, noting the “severe stress” of the job and a significant need for higher pay.

TAX COLLECTION TO IMPROVE IN JAMAICA—06/27/13
The House of Representatives of Jamaica enacted the Revenue Administration (Amendment) Act on June 19, 2013, in response to concerns about some of the law’s provisions. The new law will make major improvements in the ability of tax officials to collect taxes. Tax evasion is a large problem on the island, said Patrick Atkinson, attorney general. The new legislation gives the Commissioner General of Tax Administration Jamaica the authorities to demand useful information, facilitate efficient exercise of investigative powers, and enhance enforcement efforts.

JAMAICA TO BAN SMOKING IN PUBLIC AREAS—06/28/13
Jamaica will soon ban all smoking in public spaces, said Fenton Ferguson, the nation’s Health Minister. Businesses now have six months to display “No Smoking” signs in public areas, and all tobacco products will also need to display new warnings about the health effects of smoking.

 

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CARIBBEAN TECHNOLOGY NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending June 28th, 2013

 

KACO NEW ENERGY USES POWER PRO-TECH SERVICES FOR INVERTER SUPPORT—06/25/13
KACO new energy has announced that Pro-Tech Services has been chosen to provide inverter support for the company’s United States and Caribbean customers. PPT was selected because it invested in equipment and technology that will provide a data-driven service management program. This program is designed to improve response times and bring them into line with the demands of customers.

OLDEST BIOMEDIAL LAB IN JAMAICA GETS ACCREDITED—06/26/13
One of the oldest biomedical labs in Jamaica, Biomedical Caledonia Medical Lab Ltd., has received accreditation by the Jamaica National Agency for Accreditation (JANAAC). It has achieved the ISO-15189 international standard of competence and quality. JANAAC has presented six previous accreditation certificates since its launch in 2008. This is the first such accreditation given by JANAAC to an entity in the field of medicine, however.

FIRST CROWD-FUNDING WEBSITE IN JAMAICA TO SUPPORT MICRO BUSINESSES—06/27/13
Micro-entrepreneurs in Jamaica will soon have access to funding via a global portal website. Beginning in July 2013, the nation’s top micro-finance firm, JN Small Business Loans Ltd. (JNSBL), will open Jamaica’s first crowd-funding website at isupportjamaica.com. The portal will be open to the many Jamaicans who live overseas and who attended the 2013 Jamaica Diaspora Conference. The project is a partnership of the HN Foundation and JNSBL. It will help micro-entrepreneurs find the funding they need to grow their businesses.

ARUBA TO USE ONLY SUSTAINABLE ENERGY BY 2020—06/28/13
The island of Aruba is moving forward and plans to become the first sustainable energy economy in the world by 2020. The island, which covers 70 square miles, believes this is a realistic goal. Aruba is in tune with the overall sustainability efforts being implemented in the travel industry. Aruba built its first windmill farm in 2009 as part of a plan to reduce dependency on fossil fuels and to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Currently, 20 percent of Aruba’s electricity is produced by wind turbines.

 

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JAMAICA NEWSWEEKLY For the week ending June 28th, 2013

 

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THIS WEEK”S SUMMARY
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JAMAICAN SENATE CONSIDERS MOTION ON TRADE WITH TRINIDAD & TOBAGO—06/22/13
Dr. Christopher Tufton, Opposition Senator, has called on Jamaica’s government to create a procedure to permit private sector consultations on issues relating to trade disagreements with Trinidad and Tobago. Tufton intends to make a private members motion on this matter, noting in particular concerns involving breaches of the Treaty of Chaguaramas, which forms the legal basis from CARICOM.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS IN JAMAICA HOLD “SICK-OUT”—06/23/13
Jamaica’s air traffic controllers staged a “sick-out” to protest wage issues, lack of confidence in the current equipment they must use on the job, and additional problems they see with how the civil aviation authority is managed. The Jamaica Air Traffic Controllers Association believes its action will have an impact on international airports as well as local Jamaican airspace. Most flights continued to operate on schedule in spite of the protests, however.

CHURCH LEADERS DEMONSTRATE TO OPPOSE END OF ANTI-SODOMY LAW—06/24/13
A number of church leaders and some 1,500 demonstrators gathered for a revival meeting to protest attempts to overturn Jamaica’s anti-sodomy law and eliminate acceptance of homosexuality. The demonstrators held their service two days before the Jamaican Supreme Court will hear a petition from an activist for gay rights challenging the constitutionality of the 1864 law under the charter of rights, which was updated in 2011.

JAMAICA’S ADOPTION ACT BEING REVIEWED—06/25/13
The 50-year-old Adoption Act is being reviewed in an attempt to align the island’s adoption process more with international laws and to make it less “tedious.” Janet Cupidon Quallo, child protection specialist at the United Nation’s Children’s Fund (UNICEF), remarked that the adoption process in Jamaica is “very off putting.” In past years, she said, people have become so frustrated with the process that they have given up trying to adopt a child in Jamaica. In Jamaica, anyone 25 years or older can adopt children, and those 18 years old may adopt younger relatives.

GAY RIGHTS ACTIVIST CHALLENGES JAMAICA’S ANTI-SODOMY LAW—06/25/13
Javed Jaghai, an outreach worker for the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals & Gays, the only gay rights group in the country, received his first court hearing in his attempt to challenge a colonial-era anti-sodomy law on constitutional grounds. The 1854 law was heard in Jamaica’s Supreme Court, which gave the nation’s attorney general until the middle of September 2013 to respond to the challenge. The next hearing on the matter is scheduled for October 2013.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS RETURN TO WORK—06/26/13
Jamaica’s air traffic controllers returned to work after holding a “sick-out” in protest of pay arrangements. The two-day protest action required the civil aviation agency to call in supervisors to operate the control towers; safety was not compromised at the island’s airfields and international airports as a result. The Jamaica Air Traffic Controllers’ Association continues to demand an increase in salary, noting the “severe stress” of the job and a significant need for higher pay.

TAX COLLECTION TO IMPROVE IN JAMAICA—06/27/13
The House of Representatives of Jamaica enacted the Revenue Administration (Amendment) Act on June 19, 2013, in response to concerns about some of the law’s provisions. The new law will make major improvements in the ability of tax officials to collect taxes. Tax evasion is a large problem on the island, said Patrick Atkinson, attorney general. The new legislation gives the Commissioner General of Tax Administration Jamaica the authorities to demand useful information, facilitate efficient exercise of investigative powers, and enhance enforcement efforts.

JAMAICA TO BAN SMOKING IN PUBLIC AREAS—06/28/13
Jamaica will soon ban all smoking in public spaces, said Fenton Ferguson, the nation’s Health Minister. Businesses now have six months to display “No Smoking” signs in public areas, and all tobacco products will also need to display new warnings about the health effects of smoking.

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JAMAICAN DIASPORA NEWS
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EDUCATORS IN DIASPORA TO PROVIDE HELP TO JAMAICA—06/22/13
Susan Davis, member of the Diaspora Board in the United States, states that there are education experts among the expatriate Jamaican community that are ready to work toward filling gaps in the island’s education system as defined by the Ministry of Education. Davis said that overseas education experts are willing to work with local teachers to make improvements in Special Education, Science, Math, and Information Technology.

MEMBERS OF DIASPORA READY TO INVEST IN HOME ISLAND—06/23/13
At least three overseas Jamaicans attending the Fifth Biennial Jamaica Diaspora Conference are interested in making investments in the country of their birth. Kim Watson, vice president of the Corporate Philanthropy and Communication Partnerships, which is based in the U.S., reveals that she has already started to prepare for making investments in education.

JAMAICAN HISTORY, LANGUAGE HONORED BY MISS JAMAICA FLORIDA—06/27/13
In 2013, the Miss Jamaica Florida Pageant celebrates its 24th anniversary. To mark the occasion, the pageant theme will be “Language and Labrish – A suh dem say – A Tribute to our Spoken History.” The event will take place June 30, 2013, in Coral Springs, Florida. There are 19 contestants in the year’s pageant, ranging in age from five to 21. They will compete in four age categories and will show off their talents in song, dance, and drama. The pageant will also pay tribute to Olive Lewin, O.J., author, anthropologist and musicologist, who died in April 2013.

JAMAICAN AMBASSDOR TO JOIN UN—06/28/13
Ban Ki Moon, Secretary General of the United Nations, has received the credentials of Jamaica’s new Permanent Representative to the UN, H.E. Mr. Courtenay Rattray. The Presentation of Credentials occurred on June 25, 2013, at the headquarters of the UN in New York City. The ceremony was 15 minutes late in starting, prompting media to joke about “soon come” Jamaican time.

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CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
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FILM PRODUCTION BIG IN CARIBBEAN—06/22/13

FIRST CARIBBEAN NASCAR DRIVER HOPES TO REMAIN IN THE LEAD—06/23/13

HAITI RECEIVES GRANT TO IMPROVE WATER SERVICES—06/24/13

CARIBBEAN NATIONS WORRY ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE DANGERS—06/25/13

SUNRISE AIRWAYS TO EXPAND SERVICE TO JAMAICA, TURKS AND CAICOS—06/26/13

DRUG TRAFFICKING INCREASES IN CARIBBEAN, SAYS U.S.—06/27/13

 

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BUSINESS NEWS SUMMARY
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CAL GETS ONE MONTH, SAY JAMAICA—06/22/13
The new board of Caribbean Airlines (CAL), the airline based in Trinidad, has been given one month by Jamaica to show how it plans to use the Air Jamaica brand in the future. According to Dr. Omar Davies, Jamaica’s Minister of Transport, discussions with T&T’s Trade Minister and CAL board members included the reduction in number of flights between Jamaica and North America and how things should proceed going forward. Related to this discussion was the continued use of the Air Jamaica brand by CAL.

NO RESOLUTION IN DECADES-OLD BEEF IMPORT BAN—06/26/13
The Jamaican government says that the risk assessment process associated with the importation of beef and beef products from Canada has not yet been finished. The ban was imposed in May 2003, immediately following announcements that “mad cow disease” had been found on one cow at a Canadian farm. Because the importation of animal products is subject to risk assessment, the requirements of that assessment, which include visiting Canada and reviewing disease surveillance procedures, have yet to be satisfied, according to an official at the Ministry of Agriculture in Jamaica.

JAMAICA TO DISCUSS PETROJAM UPGRADE DURING PETROCARIBE SUMMIT—06/27/13
The government of Jamaica plans to create a schedule for implementing the upgrade and expansion of the Petrojam refinery during PetroCaribe Summit to be held in Nicaragua on June 29, 2013. The government wants to modernize operations there, said Phillip Paulwell, Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining. He said there have been discussions about upgrading the refinery for 40 years and it is now time to move forward. He cited the commitment of the Venezuelan government to forming a value-added relationship.

DIGICEL AND PARTNERS LOSE TELECOMS LICENSE BID IN MYANMAR—06/28/13
A consortium involving Digicel has not succeeded in winning the bid for a license to operation a telecommunications system in Myanmar, Southeast Asia. According to the firm, the consortium is disappointed that its bid was not successful, but that it is still committed to finding commercial opportunities in Myanmar in the future.

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CARIBBEAN TECHNOLOGY NEWS SUMMARY provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
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KACO NEW ENERGY USES POWER PRO-TECH SERVICES FOR INVERTER SUPPORT—06/25/13

OLDEST BIOMEDIAL LAB IN JAMAICA GETS ACCREDITED—06/26/13

FIRST CROWD-FUNDING WEBSITE IN JAMAICA TO SUPPORT MICRO BUSINESSES—06/27/13

ARUBA TO USE ONLY SUSTAINABLE ENERGY BY 2020—06/28/13

 

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ENTERTAINMENT
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NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE JAMAICAN PEOPLE TO OPEN—06/22/13
The Jamaican government plans to open a National Museum of the Jamaican People. The museum will house displays concerning the history of the Caribbean country, as well as its traditions and culture. According to Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller, the museum will provide a place for Jamaica’s children to learn about their history and foster pride in the achievements of the country. The museum is scheduled to open in July 2013.

CREATIVE INDUSTRY IN JAMAICA MAKES CONTRIBUTIONS TO NATIONAL EARNINGS—06/23/13
According to Jamaica Promotions (JAMPRO), more efforts will be made to attract jobs from overseas to the island’s growing animation industry. The agency expects creative industries to triple the year-to-year earnings of the country and total more than J$1.1 billion. JAMPRO plans to leverage Jamaica’s talent, language skills, and geographic location near chief markets for creative output in its efforts to obtain foreignexchange. Kevin Jackson, local animator, warns that the idea will now come to fruition without funding support for establishing studios and training workers.

KINGSTOON FESTIVAL FOCUSES ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR INVESTMENT, JOBS—06/25/13
The major animation festival in Kingston, known as KingstOOn, used its two-day run to feature animation talent and fans. It also brought the KingstOOn Animation Competition, in which Jamaican animators competed for prizes. Participating in the event were major animation experts, including Joel Kuwahara of Bento Box Entertainment, Josh Lamb, cofounder of The Shadow Gang studio, and Joan Vogelesang of Toon Boom, a top software firm that develops animation and storyboarding products used by Disney and other major studios.

SUMFEST FEATURES GRAMMY AWARD WINNERS—06/27/13
Jamaica’s Reggae Sumfest, celebrating its 21st year, will entertain thousands of music fans in Montego Bay from July 21 to 27, 2013. Featured artistes for 2013 include Grammy award winners Miguel and Flo Rida. Jamaican legends like Beres Hammond and Barrington Levy will also perform. John Lynch, Jamaican Tourism Director, notes that reggae is popular worldwide, and Sumfest provides a way for fans to experience the music they love in the country where it was born.

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SPORTS
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JAMAICAN SPRINTERS CLOSELY WATCHED AFTER FAILED DOPING TEST—06/22/13
After champion Jamaican sprinter Veronica Campbell-Brown failed a doping test and receive a provisional suspension from the national federation, all of Jamaica’s top runners were tainted by the announcement. Officials have said that 12 Jamaican athletes have received sanctions that ranged from three months to life following violations for doping in the past five years. Campbell-Brown is the most successful of the female sprinters from Jamaica, being the first to win a global 100-meter title.

BOLT WINS 100 METER FINAL AT JAMAICAN NATIONALS—06/23/13
World champion sprinter Usain Bolt of Jamaica ran the 100 meters that the Jamaican nationals in 9.94 seconds. Bolt is working toward the world championship meets in August 2013 and hopes to be in top form for the competition in Moscow. Bolt said his start and execution weren’t his “best,” but he felt good about the race overall.

JAMAICAN HURDLER INJURED IN WARM-UP—06/24/13
Hansle Parchment, Jamaica’s top hurdler, season world leader, and recipient of a bronze medal at the 2012 London Olympics, was injured during his warm-up and could not participate in the 100-meter hurdles final at the Jamaica Athletics Championships meet. However, officials said he may be able to run at the Moscow World Championships in August if he can recover in time. Andrew Riley, who won the 110-meter final, blamed the organizers of the meet for the accident that caused injury to Parchment’s ankle.

FRASER-PRYCE, WARREN WEIR, WIN 200-METERS—06/25/13
Jamaicans Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce and Warren Weir, both of whom medaled at the 2012 London Olympics, won the 200-meter titles on the last day of the Jamaica Athletics Championships. Fraser-Pryce ran the course in 22.13 seconds. Weir won his race with a time of 19.79 seconds.

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JAMAICAN JOBS
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– Executive Assistant – Details Here

– Consultants – Details Here

– Guidance Counselor – Details Here

– Executive Housekeeper – Details Here

– Pest Control Applicator – Details Here
Visit JAMAICAN JOBS.

 

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Beyond bootstraps: Why the world’s biggest democracy still fails too many of its people

An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. By Amartya Sen and Jean Drèze. Allen Lane; 434 pages; £20. To be published in America in August by Princeton University Press; $29.95. Buy from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

AS A conundrum it could hardly be bigger. Six decades of laudably fair elections, a free press, rule of law and much else should have delivered rulers who are responsive to the ruled. India’s development record, however, is worse than poor. It is host to some of the world’s worst failures in health and education. If democracy works there, why are so many Indian lives still so wretched?

Social indicators leave that in no doubt. A massive blackout last summer caught global attention, yet 400m Indians had (and still have) no electricity. Sanitation and public hygiene are awful, especially in the north: half of all Indians still defecate in the open, resulting in many deaths from diarrhoea and encephalitis. Polio may be gone, but immunisation rates for most diseases are lower than in sub-Saharan Africa. Twice as many Indian children (43%) as African ones go hungry.

Many adults, especially women, are also undernourished, even as obesity and diabetes spread among wealthier Indians. Despite gains, extreme poverty is rife and death in childbirth all too common. Prejudice kills on an immense scale: as many as 600,000 fetuses are aborted each year because they are female. Compared even with its poorer neighbours, Bangladesh and Nepal, India’s social record is unusually grim.

“An Uncertain Glory”, an excellent but unsettling new book by two of India’s best-known development economists, Amartya Sen and Jean Drèze, sets out how and why this is so. They argue that Indian rulers have never been properly accountable to the needy majority. Belgian-born Mr Drèze has lived in India since 1979 and became an Indian citizen in 2002. Now at Allahabad University in the north, he is influential among Indian policymakers, particularly for pushing a right-to-information law. Mr Sen, a Nobel laureate, now at Harvard, famously showed how famines have never happened in democracies. The two men want a debate on India’s social failures and how to fix them.

Their opponents point out that India has long suffered from slow economic growth, but has seen a steady upturn since the early 1990s. Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya, both professors at Columbia University, and long (and, at times, bitter) sparring partners with Mr Sen and Mr Drèze, argued forcefully in a recent book (see review) for more liberal reforms, notably to labour laws and land ownership. They say that pushing GDP growth back above the current 5% level, creating jobs, letting business flourish and raising revenue for government would all cut poverty.

They are surely right. But Mr Sen and Mr Drèze hope to go much further, faster. The lesson of just about every emerging economy—China and Brazil today, Europeans before—is that as economies grow, big public interventions aimed at lifting health, education and other standards result in rapid social gains. India, however, is the exception. Worse, its lagging social problems actually serve to drag down economic growth.

Indian public health is especially disturbing. Southern states like Tamil Nadu do well, but generally the country gets what it pays for: a pitiful $39 per person per year for public health, compared with China’s $203 or Brazil’s $483. In India the total amounts to 1.2% of GDP, as against a global average of 6.5%. Some of the shortfall is made up privately, as both rich and poor Indians pay doctors and quacks. But even good private providers do nothing for preventive care and better health education.

Money could be found. The government spends more subsidising fertiliser for farmers than on all public health care. Fuel subsidies, mostly helping the better off, are equally costly. Ways to raise funds exist. Taxing gold and diamond imports, for example, would bring in nearly $10 billion in annual revenue, the authors argue.

State-provided education, too, is in a shocking state. One survey of state schools in seven big northern states found no teaching activity in half of them. But sacking a teacher in India is hard. Teachers are well paid and many new schools have been built. Yet quality of instruction, the authors say, remains generally “horrifying”. Even the poor prefer private tuition; at least the teachers show up.

The diagnosis is gloomy. The authors argue that the state fails mainly because of deeply entrenched inequality. A ruling elite defined by caste, but also by gender, education and income, has an utter lack of interest—verging on contempt—in improving matters for the rest. Newspaper editors and readers, judges, NGO activists and academics are also drawn largely from privileged backgrounds, and care little.

Given the feeble state machinery and the ingrained prejudice, is there any way out? Despite the gloom, Mr Sen and Mr Drèze remain optimistic about the long-term outlook. They point to evidence that India’s bureaucrats, when properly led and held accountable, can function well. Even northern states like Himachal Pradesh and Chhattisgarh have recently inaugurated flourishing public schemes, distributing food rations on time and cheaply, for example. India is only doomed, they argue, if nobody tries to make it work.

 
 

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When Friends Always Show Up Late

    By

  • KATY MCLAUGHLIN

“Who should we invite this weekend?” I said to Alejandro.

For my husband and me, who both spent years working at least on Saturday, and sometimes Sunday, too, having our weekends free is the ultimate luxury. And since we moved into our new house, which has a pool, we prize our weekends even more. We love to invite at least one other family over for swimming, grilling, hot sun and cold beer, which our family considers the perfect way to spend the day.

There was a pause in the air before Alejandro answered, “I don’t know,” and left the room.

 

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Anne Isabelle

I knew just what that moment meant, and it made me sad: Alejandro has a long list of people he’d love to invite. But we know what would happen: By the time they arrived, hours late, the boys would be bored and whiny, we’d all be starving, and I would be spitting mad.

We have a roster of friends in the “chronically late” category. We love their company, but when they make us spend our valuable leisure time waiting around for them, I cannot help but feel that they are stealing from us what we prize the most.

***

I hope I don’t offend readers when I say that many, though not all, of our latecomer friends are, like Alejandro, South American. I realize not all South Americans are tardy, but in our circle, it’s a common trait. Americans, I have learned, are unusual in the value many of us place on punctuality. For my part, I find it excruciating to run late, and go into near panic in order to arrive at places exactly when I said I would.

Alejandro’s attitude about lateness reflects both his culture and his even-keeled personality: He doesn’t love waiting for people, but doesn’t consider it an impediment to a good relationship or a good time.

I have a very different reaction: Lateness, especially the two- and three-hour kind some of our friends have subjected us to, makes me angry, bitter and, as Alejandro has pointed out a few times, borderline hysterical.

When I was single and friendships were one-on-one relationships, I was free to deal with late friends the way I saw fit. I recall a friend during my youth in New York who came late, stood me up or changed plans at the last minute a few too many times. When she called me one day, I informed her I would no longer be making any plans with her. It was, of course, the end of our friendship, which was a loss, but then, it was my friendship to lose.

Now that I am part of a family, I can’t let my righteous indignation sever ties like that. But I also can’t enjoy socializing when I feel stepped on.

***

The way we’ve dealt with the problem is simply to avoid getting together with the chronically late. But, sadly, that blacklists a lot of the people Alejandro cares about the most.

“I feel like I’ve isolated you from the friends you want to hang out with,” I told him not long ago.

“They’re always going to be late, and you’re never going to be tolerant. No one is going to change, so it’s impossible,” he said, defeatedly.

“Maybe we could work out some system so they can be late, but I can feel less offended by it,” I suggested.

We went through our list of friends and came up with prescriptions for how to cope.

For one family, who countless times have kept us waiting at home for hours, we decided to implement a strategy of only returning to our house when they have called to say they are in our driveway. Then, and only then, we’ll come back from the park or errands and open our front door. This is, in my mind, stunningly rude behavior on our part, but in fact, they seem relieved by the lack of pressure.

For other friends, we vowed to meet them only in places where we can entertain ourselves while we wait, such as a public park, a self-serve restaurant or the beach. We also never tell our 5- and 6-year-old boys anymore that we are getting together with certain people. Instead, they are just pleasantly surprised if and when they show up.

Still others, who have just been too late too many times, are people Alejandro has to see on his own. If we run into them, I’m happy, because I really like them. But I can’t subject myself to their lateness any more.

We still don’t have a good solution for what we consider the ultimate in socializing: the poolside barbecue at our casa.

“Do we invite at 11 and plan to start by 3?” I joked.

“That’s perfect!” said Alejandro, perfectly serious.

I’m not sure if I could deal with that, but with enough hot sun and cold beer to tamp down the borderline hysteria, it’s a possibility.

 
 

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55 Million Good Reasons to Go to College

By Lauren Weber

As college costs keep rising and student-loan debt causes national consternation, more Americans are asking whether young people should bother with college.

Here, at least, is one point in favor of higher education: Americans who fail to complete at least some post-secondary education – if not a college degree, then an associate’s degree or some college credit — sabotage their chances of landing a job as the economy continues to recover, according to a new report out Wednesday.

The U.S. economy will generate 55 million job openings by 2020, according to the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and 65% of those jobs will require some training beyond a high-school education.

Of the 55 million openings, 24 million are projected to be new positions, with the balance coming from retirements of older workers. Among the fastest-growing sectors will be healthcare, community services, and science-  and technology-related fields.

At current matriculation and graduation rates, the U.S. will be short of 5 million workers with post-secondary credentials, the Center predicts.

As the U.S. has moved from an industrial economy to one based more on knowledge, jobs have demanded greater levels of education. In 1973, according to the Georgetown Center, 72% of jobs required a high-school education or less. In 2010, that figure was 41%, and by 2020, it will have fallen to 36%.

“Employers are chasing skills,” said Anthony Carnevale, the Center’s director. This is a good sign for wage growth, he added. The Center has found that college graduates earn 84% more over their lifetimes than people with only a high-school diploma, and that the gap will continue to widen.

Several organizations have shown that the majority of jobs created since the 2007-2009 recession have been low-skill, low-wage positions, primarily in fields such as retail sales, home healthcare and food service. A 2012 report from the National Employment Law Project, for example, found that 58% of the jobs added during the recovery were in categories like these.

By contrast, the Georgetown study presents an optimistic view of middle-class job creation for the near future. Carnevale said the Georgetown study uses a broader set of data than studies like NELP’s (which relies on a small sample from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey), and that, as a forecast, it is based on projections of steady though slow growth in the U.S. economy between 2010 and 2020.

“There is a certain amount of momentum in the economy and the labor market right now, and all the indicators are headed in the same direction,” he said.

The shortfall of educated workers will cost the U.S. about $500 billion per year in lost output by 2025, the Center predicted in a 2011 study.

 

 

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