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Monthly Archives: October 2013

Lorraine C. Miller Named Interim President of the NAACP

Lorraine C. Miller
http://www.unt.edu

by Frederick H. Lowe

Organizations

She becomes the second woman to hold the post

The Board of Directors of the NAACP on Sunday named Lorraine C. Miller the organization’s interim president and chief executive officer, replacing Benjamin Todd Jealous, who resigned.

Jealous addressed the board for the final time last weekend during its meeting in Las Vegas.

“This is a moment of great change and great opportunity for the NAACP,” said Roslyn M. Brock, NAACP chairman. “We are excited to work with Lorraine C. Miller during this time of transition. We are confident that Lorraine will serve the association with a steady and experienced hand as we welcome the search for the next president and CEO.”

Miller, who is a commercial real estate broker with Keller Williams Realty Inc., a national and international real estate franchise firm based in Austin, Texas, said she is honored to be selected for the job.

“I look forward to continuing the path forged by Chairman Brock and President Jealous in the months ahead. These are important times, and the important work of the NAACP will go on,” Miller said.

She lives in the Washington, D.C., area. Miller has worked for House Speakers Nancy Pelosi, Tom Foley and Jim Wright. Miller, a member of the NAACP’s national board of directors, will assume day-to-day duties Nov. 1, 2013. Jealous tenure with the NAACP ends Dec. 31, 2013. Although some news organizations are hailing Miller as the NAACP first female national president, she is not. That honor belongs to Enolia P. McMillan who served as president from 1984 to 1990. McMillan played a key role in getting the NAACP to move its headquarters to Baltimore, Md., from New York. Her presidential role was largely ceremonial, but she wielded considerable influence over the organization’s day-to-day activities.

The street near the NAACP’s Baltimore branch is named Enolia P. McMillan Way. She died in 2006 at 102.

National NAACP Board members Rev. Theresa Dear of Bartlett, Ill., and Lamell McMorris of Washington, D.C., will lead a search committee to find Jealous’ permanent replacement.

The board also inked a five-year deal with TV One to televise the NAACP Image Awards.

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2013 in African American News

 

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The Diversity Gap In American Politics Will Shock You (INFOGRAPHIC)

By Dominique Mosbergen

About 50 percent of Americans are female; 13 percent are black, 17 percent are Hispanic or Latino, and 5 percent are Asian.

Yet when you take a look at the leaders of the nation — the politicians who, representing the electorate, influence public policy and make the decisions that impact every American’s life — you’ll find that they are predominantly white and overwhelmingly male.

Only 8 percent of Congress is African American, for example. There are also only two Congresswomen for every 8 male representatives.

A new infographic by Lee & Low Books is showcasing these staggering statistics and more, highlighting the jaw-dropping diversity gap that still exists in American politics:

politics diversity

The infographic is part of Lee & Low Books’ “Diversity Gap” study series. The company, an independent children’s book publisher that specializes in diversity, has previously released infographics about the diversity gap in the Emmy Awards, the Tony Awards and thechildren’s book industry.

“The Diversity Gap studies show a distinct, societal problem that pervades entertainment, media and even our government,” a spokesman for the company told The Huffington Post Thursday. “The problems of representation, inequality, and social justice all stem from not having a seat at the proverbial table. But there are a lot of people who just don’t think there’s a problem — and you have to admit that there is a problem before you can attempt to fix it. While some would argue that we live in a ‘post racial society’ and discussions concerning race are past tense, why do the numbers look like they do?”

“Each study we do strengthens our argument that the diversity gap exists,” he added.

According to a post on Lee & Low’s blog, gerrymandering, discriminatory voter ID laws, low voter turnout rates, campaign finance rules that favor corporations and the wealthy, as well racism and sexism, are some of the major driving forces behind the government’s lack of diversity.

“Inequality in the representation of women and people of color is an entrenched societal problem,” the blog states. “The million dollar question is: Do US leaders and citizens have the will to make the necessary changes to fix government and make it an apparatus that works for all people and not just a chosen few?”

 
 

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Michael Steele on why HBCUs are hanging by a thread

 

thegrio.com

by Michael Steele

With so many of the civil rights battles behind us, and the satisfaction that comes from the success of African-Americans in business, politics, sports and entertainment, it is no surprise that the assault upon the integrity and historic purpose of our nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) has been little noticed by mainstream media and, more sadly, the black community itself.

Not only do our HBCUs stand as a testament to the challenges that lie in the future but they are an important reminder of the proud history of African-American education in America and its unlimited potential.

Across America, HBCUs are giving African-Americans the tools and the knowledge they need to fully participate in our society, to build a solid economic foundation on which to raise their families and their businesses, and to become leaders of the future.

However, many of those tools had begun to be stripped away and much of that foundation began to crumble under the weight of neglect and institutional bias. Maryland HBCUs (Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and University of Maryland Eastern Shore) were treated no differently.

In October 1999, the State of Maryland and the United States Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), entered into a partnership for the purposes of improving the educational opportunities for African Americans in Maryland’s public institutions of higher education and of ensuring compliance with the state’s obligations under federal law.  The partnership agreement set forth the commitments that the state and OCR anticipated would bring Maryland into full compliance with its obligation under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

But as the partnership agreement expired in December 2005, it was very clear that while the state had met the letter of the law under Title VI (and its agreement with OCR); embracing the spirit of such agreements would be another matter. In practice, Maryland’s HBCUs had to deal with the growing reality of “duplication of specialized programs” whereby certain resources (e.g. laboratories and libraries) or academic programs (e.g. MBA) were duplicated at predominantly white institutions, resulting in HBCU students having to go to those institutions to access them.

As Lt. Governor of Maryland, I became acutely aware of the failure of so many to do just a little to help our state’s HBCUs. But the supposed innocuousness of program duplication only masked the knife cutting away the ability to improve access to these fine institutions and to create opportunities for them to compete with the state’s majority white institutions.

For example, the idea that Coppin State University’s academic offerings, physical plant or department chairs should be comparable to and competitive with Towson State University was not a far-fetched proposition for me. After all, a quality education begins with equality of education. But the buzz saw of resistance and excuse-making by institutional forces was nothing short of stunning. Our administration was successful in getting new buildings and other physical plant investments for the HBCUs, but when we tried to set up research positions and endowed chairs, not to mention increased funding for scholarships, student services, information technologies, libraries, and other institutional infrastructures at those schools, the backlash was enormous.

The in-your-face moment for me came when two traditionally white institutions decided to create a joint MBA program between their two institutions which could well have meant the end of Morgan State University’s vaunted MBA program (established by and named after Earl G. Graves, Sr.) just six miles away. Morgan State University’s pleas to the Maryland Higher Education Commission for the integrity of its own MBA program fell largely on deaf ears as the program duplication was approved and Morgan had little recourse to stop it.

I was stunned to have certain academic and legislative “leaders” ask me directly why our administration would want to invest dollars in “those schools”.  They argued that we should put such program dollars in the predominantly white schools and allow the students from the HBCUs to visit those campuses to take a course or to use laboratories.  Understand that this occurred not in 1955 but in 2005.

So, in 2006, with the support of Governor Bob Ehrlich, I spearheaded a proactive assessment of each HBCU and the steps that would be necessary to address, in a real way, the inadequate funding of these historically black academic institutions. In our State’s final report to the OCR, we detailed our 2007 budget increases for specific programs and capital improvements that would begin the process toward parity. From significant increases in capital budgets to acquisition of property for campus-wide expansion to implementing initiatives arising out of each HBCU’s strategic plans, the goal was to establish ongoing efforts to bring equality in funding and treatment to Maryland’s HBCUs.

However, by 2008, the problem of duplication had become so problematic for HBCUs that the Bohanan Commission was established to “develop a statewide framework for higher education funding, and among its recommendations stated specifically that HBCUs become comparable and competitive with other public institutions.”

But once again, the progress would be slow and the concerns of HBCU students and alumni would fall on deaf ears until finally the Coalition for Equity and Excellence in Maryland Higher Education was formed and brought a lawsuit in 2011.

Needless to say, I was heartened by District Court Judge Catherine C. Blake’s October 7th ruling that “The State has failed to meet its burden of demonstrating there are no ongoing segregative effects that are a result of the traceable unnecessary program duplication proven by the Coalition.” And while Judge Blake deferred a final ruling in order to allow the State to mediate a remedy consistent with her findings, her ruling nonetheless exposes the lie that program duplication does not harm our HBCUs and that its ultimate affect is not discriminatory.

If you value the ruling of the District Court, then it is time for those who value the education at our nation’s HBCUs to join with those who have silently and bravely pushed back against the idea that the days of receiving a quality education at such institutions are numbered. Instead, I believe, and have argued in the halls of Annapolis, that our HBCUs nurture the talent of our young people and remain dedicated, despite the obstacles put before them, to ensuring that the next generation of African-American scientists, scholars and business leaders has a greater opportunity to reach the pinnacle of American society than the generation before them.

The students who enter those lecture halls and laboratories or cull the shelves of the library are well on their way to maximizing their opportunity in this society and to realizing the full potential of their talents. But none of that happens if they are forced to leave campus because of program duplication.

 

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‘Dark is Beautiful’ movement takes on unfair India

AFP

By Rachel O’Brien1
Indian actress and director, Nandita Das, pictured during a photocall for the Cinefondation and Short Films Jury at the 66th edition of the Cannes Film Festival in France, on May 22, 2013
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Mumbai (AFP) – Looking to find a husband, make friends, and get ahead at work? Then you need to have lighter skin. That’s the all-pervasive message in India, and it’s something that one actress is fighting to overturn.

The new poster girl of the “Dark is Beautiful” campaign, Nandita Das, has called out India’s obsession with fair skin — a prejudice she says has driven some young women to the brink of suicide.

“Magazines, TV, cinema — everywhere being fair is synonymous with being beautiful,” Das told AFP.

Described as having “dusky” skin as opposed to a fair complexion, the 43-year-old is well used to Indian preoccupations with colour, and not just in the film industry, where she has refused requests to lighten her skin for roles.

“How can you be so confident despite being so dark?” is a question regularly asked of Das, who has preferred to star in unconventional, issue-based films but says she would struggle to get ahead in mainstream Bollywood movies.

In May, Das became the face of the Dark is Beautiful campaign, launched in 2009 by activist group Women of Worth to celebrate “beauty beyond colour”.

Her backing has helped to generate increasing debate in the media, but the response has underlined just how ingrained the preference is for fairer skin, which has long been associated with higher social classes and castes.

“I started getting tonnes of emails from young women pouring their heart out about how they were discriminated against. Some wanted to commit suicide because they couldn’t be fair,” she said.

Das found her own photograph had been lightened by a newspaper even for a feature on the campaign. When looking for a nanny, she was told one candidate was “good, but quite dark”.

Amid such pressures to be pale, India’s whitening cream market swelled from $397 million in 2008 to $638 million over four years, according to market researchers at Euromonitor International.

Indian actress and director, Nandita Das, pictured …

Indian actress and director, Nandita Das, pictured during a photocall for the Cinefondation and Shor …

Skin-lightening products accounted for 84 percent of the country’s facial moisturiser market last year, their report shows.

The bias facing darker-skinned women was raised again in September when an Indian-origin woman, Nina Davuluri, won the “Miss America” contest in the United States.

“Had she been in India, far from entering a beauty contest, it is more likely that Ms Davuluri would have grown up hearing mostly disparaging remarks about the colour of her skin,” said an editorial in The Hindu newspaper.

“She would have been — going by the storyline of most ‘fairness’ cream advertisements — a person with low self-esteem and few friends.”

Last year, a commercial for an “intimate wash” to whiten vaginas emerged, showing a young Indian woman who uses the product to successfully regain her boyfriend’s attention.

The advert was widely panned, but a glance through matrimonial websites and newspaper columns suggests that fair skin, at least on a woman’s face, remains key to attaining an Indian husband.

Aspiring grooms often state in their adverts their preference for a fair bride, while nearly all women’s profiles describe their complexion as fair or so-called “wheatish”.

Ekta Ghosh, a fashion designer in Mumbai who specialises in wedding wear, said the message that only fair is beautiful had been passed down to Indian girls for generations.

“Parents, relatives, they all keep saying you should do something to lighten your skin tone,” she said.

India’s mass market whitening pioneer was “Fair & Lovely”, launched in 1975 by Hindustan Unilever and now selling in a range of other countries where pale skin is desirable, across Africa and the Middle East as well as Asia.

Miss America 2014 winner, Nina Davuluri, pictured during …

Miss America 2014 winner, Nina Davuluri, pictured during the competition at Boardwalk Hall Arena in  …

Indian consumer group Emami later came up with “Fair and Teen” for girls and “Fair and Handsome” for men.

Promoted by Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan, the latest advert shows him tossing a tube of the cream from the red carpet to a young male fan.

Dark is Beautiful has launched a petition against the “irresponsible” video and its message that “fair skin is a prerequisite for success”.

So far more than 15,000 people have signed up in protest, but Khan has not responded.

“You’re telling people they’re just not good enough,” said Das, who describes whitening cream adverts in general as “so regressive and derogatory”.

Fairness cream producers suggest they help to boost users’ confidence, although both Emami and Hindustan Unilever declined to comment for this article.

Not everyone, however, is convinced such creams are even effective.

Receptionist Prachi Chawan, 28, said she had been using Fair & Lovely products for three years “out of habit”, but was yet to see noticeable results.

“There have been no side effects but no change either,” she said.

Das believes whitening cream developers did not create Indians’ colour bias and insecurities, but have “cashed in” on it, creating a “vicious circle”.

While men’s fairness products are gaining ground, the actress says women and girls still face far more pressure over their skin tone, which she puts down to a general lack of respect and inequality.

“Until we let women have the same space as men and treat them as human beings, all this will carry on.”

 
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Posted by on October 25, 2013 in African American News

 

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JAMAICA NEWSWEEKLY For the week ending October 25th, 2013

 

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THIS WEEK”S SUMMARY
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EIGHT JAMAICANS HONORED WITH MUSGRAVE AWARDS—10/19/13
Eight Jamaicans received Musgrave Medals from the Institute of Jamaica in honor of their literary, scientific, and artistic contributions. The awardees included gold medal recipients Reinford Lee “Scratch Perry and Professor Franklin Knight. Silver medals were presented to author Marlon James, guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith; author and painter Franklin Bernal; and climate change expert, Professor Michael Taylor. Musgrave Bronze Medals were given to poet and writer Dr Pamela Mordecai, and to natural products researcher Dr Trevor Yee.

EU PROVIDES BUDGET SUPPORT FOR JAMAICA—10/20/13
Jamaica will receive $1.3 billion to support its budget from the European Union (EU). This will be in addition to the seven million Euros already received in September, 2013. The disbursements will be provided in two tranches. They relate to programs that support the continued success of the Jamaica Strategy for the Adaptation of the Sugar Industry 2006-2020, which is meant to create a commercially viable sugar cane industry.

ST. CATHERINE POLICE ASK FOR COMMUNITY HELP—10/21/13
The police in St. Catherine have asked residents of Gordon Hood, Old Harbor, St. Catherine to take a larger role in helping authorities battle the increase in crime in the area. Superintendent Carl Ferguson encouraged residents in surrounding communities to help the police as well. For over a month, criminals have run rampant through the community, committing a series of robberies. The crime wave has been made worse because of the lack of street lights in the neighborhood.

DISASTERS HAVE MORE IMPACT ON THOSE WITH LITTLE ACCESS TO TECHNOLOGY —10/22/13
In 2012, 139 million individuals around the world were impacted by natural disasters, according to Jan Gelfand, head of programs and operations at the Americas Zone of the International Federation of the Red Cross. This was the lowest number reported in ten years, but the agency noted that the people most impacted were those who had the least access to technology that might help them. Gelfand believes that new ways of applying technology to humanitarian activities represent the critical factor in effective aid in the coming decade.

SIMPSON MILLER CHALLENGES CONCACAF TO BE “HEROIC”—10/23/13
Portia Simpson Miller, Jamaica’s Prime Minister, has issued a challenge to the CONCACAF to take every action possible to life the FIFA World Cup. Simpson Miller spoke at the inaugural CONCACAF Sports Summit in the Cayman Islands, reminded attendees that they need to make the World Cup t a top priority, for the region. She asked the organization to develop a heroic spirit in order to achieve greatness.

JAMAICAN MAN FOUND WITH COUNTERFEIT NOTES—10/24/13
Dwitt Blackwood, 45, was arrested by police in Browns Hall after residents informed authorities that he was buying things with counterfeit U.S. dollars. Police alleged that he had US$550 in counterfeit notes on him when he was arrested. He also had four fake J$1000 notes and J$13,500 he received in exchange for the fraudulent foreign currency he gave to retailers.

MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITIES TO RECEIVE SOCIAL PROGRAMS—10/24/13
Sharon Ffolkes-Abrahams, Member of Parliament for West Central St. James, plans to enhance training programs in her area to reverse a trend toward increased criminal activities among its youth. She plans to spend over $5 million in her constituency on these programs. The communities of Granville and Mount Salem are the focus of the initiatives, but other communities will also benefit.

NEW CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED BY STUDENTS’ LOAN BUREAU—10/25/13
Jamaica’s Students’ Loan Bureau (SLB) has started a new initiative designed to reduce the delinquency rate. The program is called “Every Dollar Counts” and seeks to reduce the delinquency rate from its current 30 percent level. This represents about $2 billion outstanding in arrears. Collections are to be improved through better communication and appropriate payment arrangements.

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JAMAICAN DIASPORA NEWS
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JAMAICAN PRIME MINISTER TO BE INDUCTED TO WOMEN’S HALL OF FAME—10/19/13
Portia Simpson Miller, the Prime Minister of Jamaica, will be recognized by the International Women’s Forum (IWF) and inducted into the 2013 International Hall of Fame during a ceremony held at the IWF’s annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Simpson Miller will be honored as the first female Jamaican Prime Minister and as leader of the People National Party. Her contributions to nation building will be highlighted.

CONDOLENCE BOOK FOR MULLINGS AT MIAMI JAMAICAN CONSULATE—10/20/13
The Jamaican Consulate in Miami, Florida, has opened a Condolence Book for the later former Deputy Prime Minister Seymour Mullings. Mullings died on October 10, 2013, at age 82. He was recognized as one of the most esteemed public servants of Jamaica, serving as a member in the House of Representatives for 26 years. Known as “Foggy” Mullings, he also served as Finance Minister and as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Health, Local Government, and Agriculture.

DIASPORA PROJECT TO FOSTER DEVELOPMENT OF YOUNG PEOPLE—10/21/13
Arnaldo Brown, Jamaica’s Minister of State in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade has praised the Diaspora Youth Connect Project, which is designed to facilitate the growth and development of young people on the island, especially those at risk. The project was introduced on October 17, 2013 at the Planning Institute of Jamaica in Kingston. It plans to use the talents and skills of youth in the Diaspora to help young people in Jamaica realize their full entrepreneurial potential.

GOLDING SLATED FOR LECTURE SERIES IN NEW YORK—10/22/13
Former Jamaican Prime Minister Bruce Golding will be a guest presenter at the 2013 CIN Lecture Series at Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York. The series is one of the major cultural events in New York and attracts a wide variety of participants, including diplomats, media, business leaders, professors and religious authorities.

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CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
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IMPROVEMENTS TO LIAT ANNOUNCED—10/19/13

BERMUDA WINS THREE MEDALS IN CYCLING CHAMPIONSHIPS—10/20/13

EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY STARTS TRADE INFORMATION NETWORK—10/21/13

COURT RULING ON MIGRANTS IN DOMINCAN REPUBLIC CONDEMNED—10/22/13

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF ST. KITTS SHOWS INTEREST IN CUBAN REMEDY—10/23/13

CARIBBEAN, HISPANIC ARTISTS SHOWCASED IN FLORIDA—10/24/13
 

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BUSINESS NEWS SUMMARY
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SIX FINALISTS SEEK MICROENTREPRENEURSHIP AWARDS—10/19/13
Three microfinance institutions and three microentrepreneurs in the Caribbean are the finalists competing for the 2013 Citi Microentrepreneurship Awards for the region. The winners will be announced on October 31, 2013, in Kingston. The awards are given in recognition of microfinance institutions and microentrepreneurs demonstrating success in the Caribbean.

PLANT TO TEST EXTRACTION OF RARE EARTH TO OPEN IN JAMAICA—10/23/13
Researchers will be testing the commercial viability of rare earth extraction at a pilot plant in Jamaica. The nation is partnering with Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd. of Japan. This firm holds a patent for a kind of technology necessary to extract rare-earth elements from the residue of red bauxite. The plant is expected to process about 33 tons of dry red mud from the island’s mining areas to determine its commercial potential.

NO IMPORT LIMITS TO STOP DROP IN JAMAICAN DOLLAR—10/21/13
Brian Wynter, governor of the Bank of Jamaica, announced that no intensification or imposition of import limits will occur in order to improve the value of the Jamaican dollar. The government believes that pressure on the dollar will be relaxed only if the balance of payment environment improves. There are concerns about whether the government can maintain the commitments stated in the Revised Letter of Intent to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) while the dollar continues to fall compared to the U.S. currency.

CUBA, JAMAICA TO STRENGTHEN TRADE COOPERATION—10/24/13
Bernardo Guanche Hernandez, Cuba’s ambassador to Jamaica, said that his country wants to deepen its cooperative efforts with Jamaica in the trade sector. Relations between Cuba and Jamaica are at an all-time high, and the countries are looking for ways to improve the trade relationship even further. Hernandez made his remarks in advance of a scheduled meeting of energy ministers from Caribbean and Latin American countries on October 24 through 25, 3013, in St. James.

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Caribbean Science and Technology News provided by Caribbeantopnews.com
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HIGH ELECTRICITY COSTS HINDER ECONOMIC GROWTH IN CARIBBEAN—10/19/13

RED LIONFISH TAKING OVER CARIBBEAN—10/20/13

TELECOM PROVIDER CHOOSE CALIX E7—10/21/13

RARE CARIBBEAN PLANTS COULD BE LISTED AS “ENDANGERED”—10/22/13

 

 

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ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
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FLIPPA MODELLA ARRESTED IN U.S. ON DRUG CHARGES—10/19/13
The Jamaican dancehall artiste Flippa Modella, whose real name is Andrew Davis, was arrested by state police in New Jersey on allegations that he is running an international drug trafficking and money laundering operation. His brother Kemar was also arrested following a 2.5-year investigation. According to the allegations, Modella took over the transnational shipping operations that send drugs from California to New Jersey.

JAMAICAN SINGER A HIT ON U.S. TV TALENT SHOW—10/23/13
The Voice, a hit television program in the United States, features singers in competition in front of well-known musicians who act as judges. Jamaica’s Tessane Chin has been wowing the audiences since her first appearance on the show and has even been called the “winner” of the competition by Judge Blake Shelton.  She has won every one of her one-to-one singing battles on the show to date, which moves her closer to the ultimate goal of winning over the entire slate of competitors.

JAMAICAN ACTOR PLAYS SHAKESPEARE LEAD—10/24/13
David Heron, Jamaican actor and playwright, will play the leading role in the Shakespeare play “Coriolanus – The African Warrior” at the 2013 Harlem Shakespeare Festival in New York. This production will run from October 31, 2013 through November 10, 2013 at the Poet’s Den Theater in East Harlem. This play has not been as well known as others by Shakespeare, but it has gained in popularity recently.

FENDA, JOHN JOHN FOCUS ON AUTHENTIC ROOTS MUSIC—10/25/13
Chuck Fenda’s new album “Jah Elements” was created to become a classic. The album was produced by the reggae artiste and John John at King Jammy’s studio. Fenda says the “vibe that we hold on this album is spiritually deep.” In this album, the two musicians are harking back to the authentic roots reggae. Fenda noted that John John was one of the first music producers to record his music in the early 1980s.

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SPORTS
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ATKINSON WINS GOLD, SILVER WORLD SWIMMING MEDALS—10/19/13
Alia Atkinson of Jamaica won the gold and silver medals on the second day of the World FCup in short pools in Dubai. Atkinson won gold in the 100-meter combined styles and silver in the 50-meter breast stroke.

HEAD OF WADA CRITICIZES JAMAICAN AUTHORITIES—10/21/13
John Fahey, head of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), expressed dismay at Jamaican authorities for failing to facilitate an independent audit of the Jamaican anti-doping regime and postponing such an audit until 2014. Fahey said this is unacceptable to WADA and said the agency would “act appropriately” in response.

CONCACAF PRESIDENT SUPPORTS HELP FROM REGIONAL PRO LEAGUE—10/22/13
According to Jeffrey Webb, president of CONCACAF, a regional professional league would help Caribbean countries qualify for the World Cup. Webb plans to appoint a group of experts to investigate options for a league. Webb believes there is enough talent in the region to support a league.

JAMAICA TAEKWON-DO ASSOCIATION MAKES WORLD CUP PLANS—10/24/13
The Jamaica Taekwon-Do Association, headed by its president Arthur Barrows, has traveled to Spain to determine what requirements must be met when Montego Bay hosts the 2014 World Cup at Rose Hall Convention Center. Barrows addressed the International Taekwon-Do Federation, outlining the country’s plans for the event, which has only been held in the Western hemisphere once since its beginning in 2004.

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JAMAICAN JOBS
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– Legal Counsel/Corporate Secretary – Details Here

– Restaurant Supervisors  – Details Here

– Manager – Investigation Division – Details Here

– Assistant Investigator – Details Here

– Machine Operators – Bag Making Department – Details Here
Visit JAMAICAN JOBS.

 

 

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CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending October 25th, 2013

 

IMPROVEMENTS TO LIAT ANNOUNCED—10/19/13
Julie Reifer-Jones, acting chief executive officer of the Caribbean airline LIAT, sent a message to the company’s staff members announcing that the comfort and well-being of its passengers will be its top priority. She emphasized the importance of passengers’ security as well. LIAT has been in business for 57 years in the Caribbean, and in many areas, it is the major carrier.
BERMUDA WINS THREE MEDALS IN CYCLING CHAMPIONSHIPS—10/20/13
Bermuda received three medals at the Caribbean Cycling Championships in Curacao, with women cyclists leading the way. Zonique Williams won a silver medal for Bermuda in the road race, while Nicole Mitchell won two bronze medals. Bermuda’s men’s team did not win any medals at the competition.

EXPORT DEVELOPMENT AGENCY STARTS TRADE INFORMATION NETWORK—10/21/13
The Belize National Trade Information Network, or N-TIN, was launched by the Caribbean Export Development Agency on October 11, 2013. Belize is one of the six nations determined to be in a position to go ahead with the establishment of such a network. The N-TINs are designed to provide enhanced trade information services and create appropriate regional mechanisms to respond to the needs of CARIFORUM  exporters and the private sector overall.

COURT RULING ON MIGRANTS IN DOMINCAN REPUBLIC CONDEMNED—10/22/13
Fifteen Caribbean countries have criticized a court ruling in the Dominican Republic that takes citizenship away from the children of migrant workers. The Constitutional Court decided in September 2013 to block citizenship for individuals born to immigrant parents who lack residency permits. The ruling will affect citizenship dating from 1929. Critics say this decision will affect over 200,000 people, almost all who are Dominican-born individuals of Haitian descent.

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF ST. KITTS SHOWS INTEREST IN CUBAN REMEDY—10/23/13
The Deputy Prime Minister of St. Kitts and Nevis, Earl Asim Martin, expressed his interest in a medicinal remedy used in Cuba during an official visit to that country. Heberprot-B is one of the only medicines in the world that is effective in fighting diabetic foot ulcers. He said his country is willing to buy and use the product and invited Cuban specialists to conduct evaluations on its efficacy in St. Kitts.

CARIBBEAN, HISPANIC ARTISTS SHOWCASED IN FLORIDA—10/24/13
The Ansin Family Art Center Gallery at the Miramar Culture Center in Florida will highlight the contributions of Caribbean and Latin American artists to contemporary American culture. The exhibit features the works of 20 artists from Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Venezuela, and Puerto Rico.

SIMPSON MILLER CHALLENGES CONCACAF TO BE “HEROIC”—10/23/13
Portia Simpson Miller, Jamaica’s Prime Minister, has issued a challenge to the CONCACAF to take every action possible to life the FIFA World Cup. Simpson Miller spoke at the inaugural CONCACAF Sports Summit in the Cayman Islands, reminded attendees that they need to make the World Cup t a top priority, for the region. She asked the organization to develop a heroic spirit in order to achieve greatness.

JAMAICAN MAN FOUND WITH COUNTERFEIT NOTES—10/24/13
Dwitt Blackwood, 45, was arrested by police in Browns Hall after residents informed authorities that he was buying things with counterfeit U.S. dollars. Police alleged that he had US$550 in counterfeit notes on him when he was arrested. He also had four fake J$1000 notes and J$13,500 he received in exchange for the fraudulent foreign currency he gave to retailers.

MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITIES TO RECEIVE SOCIAL PROGRAMS—10/24/13
Sharon Ffolkes-Abrahams, Member of Parliament for West Central St. James, plans to enhance training programs in her area to reverse a trend toward increased criminal activities among its youth. She plans to spend over $5 million in her constituency on these programs. The communities of Granville and Mount Salem are the focus of the initiatives, but other communities will also benefit.

NEW CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED BY STUDENTS’ LOAN BUREAU—10/25/13
Jamaica’s Students’ Loan Bureau (SLB) has started a new initiative designed to reduce the delinquency rate. The program is called “Every Dollar Counts” and seeks to reduce the delinquency rate from its current 30 percent level. This represents about $2 billion outstanding in arrears. Collections are to be improved through better communication and appropriate payment arrangements.

 

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CARIBBEAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending October 25th, 2013

 

HIGH ELECTRICITY COSTS HINDER ECONOMIC GROWTH IN CARIBBEAN—10/19/13
Albert Ramdin, the assistant secretary general of the Organization of America States, believes that the high cost of electric power in the region is keeping economic growth rates down. He made his remarks at the opening of the 2013 Caribbean Renewable Energy Forum in Aruba. Ramdin told Caribbean officials to look to renewable energy sources to reverse the trend. High energy costs impact the cost of all goods and services and undermine investment and growth.

RED LIONFISH TAKING OVER CARIBBEAN—10/20/13
The Red Lionfish cannot be seen by its prey, say researchers from James Cook University. This could be one of the reasons that the spiny, poisonous fish has been so successful in the reef ecosystem of the Caribbean. While lionfish are Pacific Ocean natives, they have been proliferating in the Caribbean Basin since they were introduced there by accident in the 1980s. Scientists have been trying to determine why the predatory species has been able to essentially “eat their way” through the reef environment.

TELECOM PROVIDER CHOOSE CALIX E7—10/21/13
Columbus International Inc., a top telecommunications provider in the Caribbean region, has chosen the Calix E7 Ethernet Service Access Platforms and 836GE Residential Services Gateways in its expansion of fiber initiatives. The expanded fiber technology will improve the delivery of digital voice, managed IP video and advanced data services to homes and business in the Caribbean and Latin America.

RARE CARIBBEAN PLANTS COULD BE LISTED AS “ENDANGERED”—10/22/13
Three plants from the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico could soon be listed as endangered by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service. The plants, Egger’s agave, island brittleleaf, and Puerto Rico manjack, are under imminent threat from land development. These plants have been waiting for federal protection since 1980.

 

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