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CARIBBEAN NEWS SUMMARY for the week ending March 7th, 2014

07 Mar

ATTEMPTS MADE TO SAVE BANANA INDUSTRY IN DOMINICA—03/01/14
In 2007, Hurricane Dean devastated the banana industry of Dominica, and the agricultural sector remains vulnerable to natural disasters like this in 2014. Every year, farmers in Dominica lose a significant percentage of their crops and livestock during the annual hurricane season. Bananas and avocados are especially at risk, and the banana industry represents a significant source of foreign exchange for the country.
OPPOSITION LEADER IN ST.VINCENT WANTS CHANGE AT CONSULATE IN NY—03/02/14
Arnhim Eustace, Opposition Leader in St. Vincent and the Grenadines is calling for the administration led by Ralph Gonsalves to make changes in the New York Consulate General after an alleged scandal that resulted in the recall of Deputy Consul Edson Augusta. The negative image of the Consulate General should be remedied immediately, says Eustace, a former prime minister.

HUMAN RIGHTS PRACTICES IN CARIBBEAN CRITICIZED BY U.S.—03/03/14
The United States is criticizing nations in the Caribbean for what it believes are poor human rights practices in the region. The U.S. Department of State issued a country report on human rights for 2013 and was especially harsh in regard to Haiti, Jamaica, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Bahamas. The report noted the responsibility of governments in those nations to protect human rights of all their citizens.

GUYANA WELCOMES INVESTORS FROM CHINA—03/04/14
Guyana’s President Donald Ramotar is extending a welcome to all Chinese investors, noting that partnerships are necessary to bring the country into full economic bloom. He made his remarks at the opening of a new Chinese-owned shipyard in Coverden, East Bank Demerara, and the christening of a logging vessel, also from China.

CONSERVATIONISTS LAUNCH CAMPAIGN TO SAVE SHARKS—03/05/14
In Trinidad and Tobago, the shark sandwich may become a thing of the past as conservationists target fishing for shark in the region. The sandwiches have long been considered an essential part of island cuisine, but the local Papa Bois Conservation organization wants a ban on catching sharks in order to protect the population of the marine predators, which is decreasing rapidly.

CHANGING RAINY SEASON HARMS CROPS IN BARBUDA—03/06/14
Water rationing has become common for the 1,800 people who live on Barbuda. The island has been in the throes of a long drought, and its main agricultural area, the Highlands, has been particularly impacted.  According to John Mussington, marine biologist, the wet period of the year has shifted from July to September, the traditional months, to September to November. And when it does rain, the showers are hard and end quickly. Without storage methods, the rainwater runs out to sea or goes underground, where it becomes permeated with salt, magnesium and calcium.

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